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TRENCH and CAMP
August 26, 1919


  

Trench and Camp

CAMP SPORT STUFF

 

“Greaseball” Weeps On Necks Of Sports Fans As He Bids Good Bye

This is the “Goodbye Number” of Trench and Camp.  The war is over now, and the powers that be are giving the old sheet the gate.  It’s tough to be a a sport editor one day and a common or garden loafer, like Mike Ryan, Al Reich and Cassidy, the next, but this has been a tough war, and we have been getting more or less used to the tough breaks.  Life at Camp Upton, however, was not as tough as we thought it was going to be.  It was tougher.

            Two years is a long time to fight a battle like the Battle of Camp Upton, and yet we now look back on the hardships that we endured- those terrible days when the brave boys of the 77th were dying of thirst and nothing to drink but water; the awful fight for liberty when the boys went four rounds in the boxing tournaments to get a pass to the city; the Sunday night rides on the on the old “eleven-fifty-five,” or the “Long Island Dilapidated,” and the fearful scenes at Reveille when the air was filled with shrieks of the dying and the groans of the dead.

            But through it all shines one ray of light.  Upton was never off the map as far as sports were concerned, when the first batch of National Army men arrived in camp, to the present, when even the gold-bricks at the Base are getting tired of it, sports have occupied a prominent place in the daily routine of the Upton soldiers, and T. & C. has been the official sport directory of the camp.

            In murmuring this last found farewell to the camp and the remaining athletes and the sports fans, the sported, recalls several happy memories of pleasant experiences when the old camp was going full blast, and of acquaintances made with some of the best athletes and sportsmen the country has produced.

            Mr. B. F. Bryant, the Y. M. C. A. athletic director, and the pioneer of athletic work at Upton; Benny Leonard, best of ‘em all, modest, clean-cut, and untiring in his efforts to promote the “noble art”;  Captain Frank Glick, the likable, able old Princeton Football star, who worked such wonders with the 77th;  Captain Allen, the canny Scot, and his assistant in cold-blooded murder, scientifically called Ju-Jitsu, Mr. Heneshi, twin brother to Hashamaru Togo; John Gaddi amateur light-heavy champ; Paul Edwards, who made such a record in the ring with the A.E.F.; Ted (Kid) Lewis, world’s welter weight champ; Bert Barron, football coach, old Penn State star; Goldberg of Columbia; Bart Carroll of Colgate, and Ellsworth Mcmullan, of Bates, who went fifty-fifty on broken legs in the last game of the season against Dix last year; Jimmy Davies, Upton’s cleaver quarterback, well-known Wyoming University star; Leon Cadore, the Brooklyn Twirler; Jakey Deufel, the old Fire Department catcher. now playing with Toronto in the International League; Larry Scudder, the U. of Penn. half-miler and sprinter, who was on the winning A.E.F. relay team; Major DuBois, father of Upton tennis, and a host of other down to the present dynasty; Mike Ryan, long-distance runner, twice on the American Olympic team; Al Reich, long distance boxer (long distance from his head down to his feet), one of the best heavies in the game; Cassidy, long-distance golf champ, who shakes a mean mashie when he isn’t coaching baseball, Young Burns, pet of the Patchogue petooties and lightweight champ of the camp, and the only man in Upton to lay a shiner on the sport ed; good fellows, all of ‘em, men we are all glad to meet and proud to know; Upton’s aristocracy of sport; they played a big part in upholding the traditions of the American Army and in preserving the morale of the camp.  Few communities could claim such a host of celebrities in the athletic world, and Upton is justly proud of ‘em. 

            Trench and Camp bids ‘em all “goodbye” and thanks ‘em all and thanks you all, dear sports fans, for your good fellowship in sport.

                                                            Yours to a cinder,

The sports-editor—GREASEBALL

                                                1st Class

 

PACIFICATOR JOHNNY

            Johnny Burns, lightweight champion of Camp Upton, has been discovered in a new role.  The girls working in the lace mill at Patchogue, L. I., have gone on strike, and Johnny has been appointed walking delegate. 

            He has considerable experience with two ladies answering to the names Sadie and Sophy.  Sadie refused to walk out with the rest of the gang, and Sophy wants Johnny to knock the illustrious block off the army field clerk who took her job when the strike was called.

            As a labor union arbiter, Johnny makes a good masseur.

 

Fred Dyer, K. Of C. Pug, Once Upton Soldier

            Frank Dyer, old-time Australian welterweight and one of Jimmy Twyford’s stable of boxers on the K. of C. camp circuit, is another Uptonian who made good.

            Dyer came to Upton on the draft, but was turned down because of a previous discharge from the British service.  While at Upton dyer showed his prowess as a boxer, organizer and leader of men, and was recommended for service as a boxing instructor.  He attended the training school by special appointment from Washington, and was appointed camp boxing instructor at Camp Grant, Illinois.

            While at Camp Grant, Dyer staged the record boxing tournaments of the American cantonments.  In the course of one week of inter-company boxing, 1,500 men participated in the contest. 

            Dyer is one of the few men in this country that has boxed with the late Les D’Arey, the unfortunate Australian middleweight champion who died recently from pneumonia, after an unsuccessful bid for the opportunity to box in America.

 

431st Beats Sailors

          The 431st Service Battalion went to Bayshore Sunday and hung the crepe on the sailor boys, winning by a score of 10-4.  The feature of the game was the fine pitching of Hayden and the hitting of Sewell, who knocked out a homer and a double, besides getting a walk.

 

Good Boxing Bouts

            The boxing Programs promoted weekly by the K. of C. continue to attract big audiences.  Last week the program was better than ever.  In the lightweight class Powers and Flynn went five fast rounds.  Powers put his man down twice, and Quinn went strong in the last round, sending his man through the ropes.  The bout was even.

            In Frankie Clark, Packy O’Gatty stacked up against a good man, but as O’Gatty was conceding a lot of weight, the decision did not go against him.  Clark showed class throughout, using a left jab and right cross to good effect.  In the fourth and fifth rounds O’Gatty came back strong, scoring repeatedly with right and left hooks to the head.  No decision.

 

Holding the Base

By G.A.P.

            Sergeant Harry Benjamin, recently reduced to field clerk, is making good on his boast that he would get a nine together to “knock ‘em all dead.”  His team “beat the socks off” the hitherto undefeated Service Battalion, and that, as Chaplain Jefferson, the manager of the colored nine, would remark, was suah some feat.”

        BELT AND LYNCH COMPRISED THE BATTERY FOR THE REMINGTON RAPPERS.  BELT WAVES A WICKED WING AND LYNCH TALKS THE BATTERS WALLEYED.

             And Manager “Benny,” the old Texas terror, still wields a wicked willow and gathers up everything that comes his way in the field.  “Benny” hit safe twice in three times at bat.  Lynch made a single and a double, and Undergagt and Conklin also hit two singles.

             “Benny said it reminded him of the days when he followed the ponies.  He put his money on a long shot, and “Benny” says the animal started at “ten to one,” but she didn’t come home till a quarter to four.

             The indoor sports at the Base Hospital have given baseball the air.  The Red Cross conducts parties almost daily, and it is terrible the way those poor gold bricks suffer.

 

            THE TIME HONORED: “WHEN DO WE EAT?” HAS GIVEN PLACE TO: “WHEN DO WE PARTI WITH THE PARTY? 

 

            Beaucoup dames!  Beaucoup dance!  Beaucoup music! Beaucoup swim!  and beaucoup eats!  And then the doctors at the Base wonder why some of these gold-bricks threatened to have another war if they are discharged.

             Strikes are the order of the day in the big village.  The strike on the subway seems to have resulted in a sub-traction of subtraction.

 

            AND WITHOUT INTENDING TO BE PROFANE, SEVERAL NEW YORKERS WHO HAVE BEEN HOOFING IT HOME OF LATE HAVE BEEN MUTTERING, “WHAT THE ‘L’!”

             And the question that will soon occupy the mind of Camp “Casey” Secretary Dockray will be, “Can we see McCann?”

 

            “WHERE’S THE FORD – AND WHERE’S THE CHAUFFEUR?”  DOCKRAY SHOUTED, FULL OF FIGHT.  “THAT  M’CANN’S A LOW-DOWN LOAFER, WE MAY CAN M’CANN TONIGHT.”

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