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Awards and Citations of the 306th Infantry


HISTORY
of
THE 306th INFANTRY

By
Colonel Julius Ochs Adler
1935
Awards to the Members of the 306th Infantry


AWARDS TO MEMBERS OF

THE 306TH INFANTRY

MEDAL OF HONOR

FIRST LIEUTENANT DWITE H. SCHAFFNER
Company K. Near St. Hubert's Pavilion, Boureuilles, France, September 28, 1918.

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy near St. Hubert's Pavilion, Boureuilles, France, September 28, 1918. In com-mand of Company K, 306th Infantry, he led his men in an attack on St. Hubert's Pavilion through terrific enemy machine-gun, rifle and artillery fire and drove the enemy from a strongly held intrenched position, after hand-to-hand fighting. His bravery and contempt for danger inspired his men, enabling them to hold fast in the face of three determined enemy counterattacks. His company's position exposed to enemy fire from both flanks, he made three efforts to locate an enemy machine-gun which had caused heavy casualties in his company. On his third reconnaissance he discovered the gun position and personally silenced the gun, killing or wounding the crew thereof. The third counterattack made by the enemy was initiated by the appearance of a small detachment advancing well in advance of .the enemy attacking wave, calling as they advanced, "Kamerad." When almost within reach of the American front line the enemy attacking wave behind them appeared, attacking vigorously with pistols, rifles, and hand grenades, causing heavy casualties in the American platoon holding the advanced position. Lieutenant Schaffner mounted the parapet of the trench and used his pistol and grenades with great gallantry and effect, killing a number of enemy soldiers, finally reaching the enemy officer, a captain, shooting and mortally wounding the latter with his pistol, and dragging the captured officer back to the company's trench, securing from him valuable information as to the enemy's strength and position. The information so secured enabled Lieutenant Schaffner to maintain for five hours the advanced position of his company despite the fact that it was surrounded on three sides by strong enemy forces. The undaunted bravery, gallant soldierly conduct, and leadership displayed by Lieutenant Schaffner undoubtedly saved the survivors of the company from death or capture. Residence at appointment: Falls Creek, Pa.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

COLONEL GEORGE VIDMER
Near Zube, France, September 27, 1918, and St. Juvin, France,
October 14, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near Zube, France, September 27, 1918, and St. Juvin, France, October 14, 1918. By his personal presence, example, and determination he repulsed strong counterattacks and drove the enemy from important positions north of Zube. On October 14 he personally directed the attack of his unit and carried it forward to a successful conclusion under heavy machine-gun, rifle and artillery fire. Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered Military Academy from Alabama.

MAJOR JULIUS OCHS, ADLER
At St. Juvin, France, October 14, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action at St. Juvin, France, October 14, 1918. Accompanied by another officer, Major Adler was supervising the work of clearing the enemy from St. Juvin when they suddenly came upon a party of the enemy numbering 150 Firing on the enemy with his pistol, Major Adler ran toward the party, calling on them to surrender. His bravery and good marksmanship resulted in the capture of 50 Germans, and the remainder fled. Residence at appointment: New York Times, New York, N. Y.

MAJOR ARCHIBALD G. THACHER
At St. Juvin, France, October 14, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action against St. Juvin, France,
October 14, 1918. While commanding the 2nd Battalion in a
flank march across the Aire River, Major Thacher, acting with the greatest gallantry and with utter disregard for his own safety, personally made a reconnaissance in the face of heavy hostile machine-gun and shell fire, well in advance of his battalion, thereby saving his command from heavy losses. It was due to his thorough reconnaissance that his subsequent successful attack on this strong hostile position was consummated. Residence at appointment: 49 East 51st Street, New York, N. Y.

CAPTAIN ROBERT COSTA DE BEAUREGARD
23rd Infantry Regiment, Territorials, French Army, attached to
3o6th Infantry, 77th Division, United States Army. At St. Juvin,
France, October 14, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action at St. Juvin, France, October 14, 1918. When communication with the forward observation post was broken and no runners were available, Captain de. Beauregard voluntarily carried a message to the observation post through intense shell fire, displaying great bravery and coolness, and succeeded in reestablishing communication with the regimental post of command. Next of kin: Comtesse Robert Costa de Beauregard, 6 rue La Tremoille, Paris, France.

CAPTAIN BRADFORD ELLSWORTH
Near La Besace, France, November 5, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near La Besace, France,
November 5, 1918. He displayed great courage by leading a mounted reconnaissance patrol a kilometer in advance of our lines, developed the enemy's line by drawing fire from his machine-guns, and remained under this heavy machine-gun fire until the emplacements had been located. Residence at appointment: Yale Club, New York, N. Y.

CAPTAIN ROBERT P. PATTERSON
Near Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918. Captain Patterson, accompanied by two non-commissioned officers, made a daring daylight reconnaissance into the enemy lines. He surprised an enemy outpost of superior numbers and personally destroyed the outpost. Later he again had an encounter with another outpost, during which several of the enemy were killed or wounded and one member of his patrol wounded. The enemy advanced their outposts, and Captain Patterson covered the retreat of his patrol, during which he dropped into a depression and feigned being killed in order to escape capture. Here he lay until he was able to escape to his lines under cover of darkness. Residence at appointment: Glens Falls, N. Y.

CAPTAIN HERMAN EDWARD STADIE
At Ferme-des-Dames, west of Fismes, France, August 20, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action at Ferme-des-Dames, west of Fismes, France, August 20, 1918. While the vicinity of the regimental command post where he was stationed was under heavy bombardment, Captain Stadie, without thought of personal danger, voluntarily ran outside through shrapnel and high- explosive shells, and rescued a wounded runner. Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Residence at appointment: 2564 Creston Avenue, New York, N. Y.

FIRST LIEUTENANT THOMAS J. DUNNE, Chaplain
During the Meuse-Argonne offensive.

For extraordinary heroism in action during the Meuse--Argonne offensive. While a crossroads was being heavily shelled by enemy artillery and after several men had been killed and others wounded, Chaplain Dunne, utterly disregarding his own safety, went to their assistance and ministered to them. He constantly exposed himself to the heaviest fire in order to assist the wounded men of his regiment, at all times displaying heroic conduct and superb devotion to his duty. His splendid and consistent bravery and contempt for his own safety was a continuing inspiration to every man of his regiment and served to build up a fine sense of duty and soldierly obligation in the organization. Residence at appointment: 405 West 125th Street, New York, N. Y.

FIRST LIEUTENANT MICHAEL JOSEPH HAYES*
At Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918, and St. Juvin, France, October 14, 1918.

For repeated acts of extraordinary heroism in action at Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918, and St. Juvin, France, October 14, 1918. On August 14 Lieutenant Hayes led a patrol of five men in broad daylight and without any cover attempting to rescue his company commander, who had fallen wounded near a German machine-gun nest. Failing to find the wounded officer, he crawled to within twenty yards of the post, attacked it with great dash and gallantry, inflicting a number of casualties in spite of heavy fire from enemy machine-guns and hand grenades. On October 14 this officer led his platoon forward into the attack with energy and courage, in the face of heavy artillery and machine-gun fire. In the face of direct fire from enemy machine-guns upon his platoon, disregarding his own personal safety, he went forward to reconnoiter and to find cover for his men from which to continue the attack. In the performance of this courageous enterprise he was killed by machine-gun fire. Residence at appointment: 9214 Empire Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio.

FIRST LIEUTENANT THEODORE S. KENYON
In the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action in the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27, 1918. He displayed exceptional qualities of leadership and gallantry in action while leading his company against a counterattack of the enemy in superior numbers. Later, although three times wounded, he remained with his command. Residence at appointment: 321 West 82nd Street, New York, N. Y.

FIRST LIEUTENANT CHARLES O'BRIEN
Near Le Cendriere Woods, near the Aisne Canal, France, September 6, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action in Le Cendriere Woods, near the Aisne Canal, September 6, 1918. Lieutenant O'Brien

Posthumous award. led his platoon forward toward Le Cendriere Woods under heavy shell fire. When wounded in the left leg, one of his men urged him to stop and have the wound dressed. He answered, "Never mind that; they can't stop us!" and led his platoon through the woods to the bank of the Aisne Canal, where, while placing his men in position, he was struck again and killed. His dauntless courage presented an inspiring example to the men of his platoon. Residence at appointment: 44 N. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.

FIRST LIEUTENANT PHILIP K. ROBINSON
Near Mont Notre Dame, France, September 10, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near Mont Notre Dame, France, September 10, 1918. The 3rd Battalion, 3o6th Infantry, having relieved another regiment in a position in front of Mont Notre Dame, it was reported that wounded members of the organization relieved were in the Bois-de-Cendriere in front of the position occupied by the 3rd Battalion. Lieutenant Robinson, together with a non-commissioned officer and a private of his battalion, volunteered to search the wood and proceeded on his hazardous mission crossing an open field, a distance of six hundred yards, under direct observation of the enemy and under a concentration of heavy machine-gun and artillery fire. Finding several wounded men, he assisted them to return to their own lines, undoubtedly saving their lives. The extraordinary heroism and soldierly devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Robinson greatly inspired the men of his battalion. Residence at appointment: 802 Mason Street, Green Bay, Wis.

FIRST LIEUTENANT PAUL KRUSA ROTH
Near St. Thibaut, Bazoches, France, September 10, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Thibaut, Bazoches, France, September 10, 1918. Constantly exposed to a terrific concentration of enemy machine-gun and shell fire, without regard to his own safety, he voluntarily and unassisted rescued five badly wounded men of his regiment, carrying each man upon his back for a distance of one hundred and fifty yards, at all times under observation of the enemy occupying the town of Bazoches. His heroic conduct served as an impressive example to every man of his regiment. Residence at appointment: 421 Seventh Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.

SECOND LIEUTENANT CHARLES S. DENNISON
In the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27, 1918-

For extraordinary heroism in action in the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27, 1918. He was in command of a patrol sent out in the afternoon to locate a machine-gun nest. In the course of this operation he received a severe wound, but after reporting the location of the machine-gun nest at company head-quarters he immediately returned to the vicinity of the machine-gun nest and spent the greater part of the night searching for a member of his patrol who was missing. Although he was suffering severe pain from his wounds, he refused to go to the first-aid station before the missing soldier was found. Residence at appointment: 2288 Elm Street, Denver, Colo.

FIRST SERGEANT HERMAN M. SELL
Company A. In Le Cendriere Woods, near Vauxcere, France,
September 6, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action in Le Cendriere Woods, near Vauxcere, between the Vesle and the Aisne, France, September 6, 1918. Sergeant Sell volunteered to deliver a message of great importance to his battalion commander after six runners who had been sent with the same message failed to return. He voluntarily crossed six hundred yards of open field swept by shell and machine-gun fire, reached his destination, accomplished his mission, and returned to his company with information of vital importance. Residence at enlistment: Jackson Avenue, Seaford, N. Y.

SERGEANT GEORGE W. BEATTY
Medical Detachment. At St. Juvin, France, October 15, 1918-

For extraordinary heroism in action at St. Juvin, France, October 15, 1918. He went forward to dress the wounds of
an officer who could not be brought in because of the exceedingly heavy machine-gun fire, his bravery being instrumental in saving the officer's life. Throughout the entire day this soldier worked tirelessly at the dressing station under heavy shell fire until he was completely exhausted, showing a persistent devotion to duty. Residence at enlistment: 1462 S. Sherman Street, Denver, Colo.

SERGEANT PATRICK FREEMAN
Company B. In the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27,
1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action in the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27, 1918. He displayed exceptional courage and bravery while leading his platoon against enemy machine-gun and trench-mortar positions and putting them out of action. Although wounded, this soldier remained on duty with his platoon, killing and capturing several of the enemy and finally occupying part of the hostile trench. Residence at enlistment: 458 East 140th Street, New York, N. Y.

SERGEANT GALBRAITH WARI) *
Company M. Near Mont Notre Dame, France, September io,
1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near Mont Notre Dame, France, September 10, 1918. Voluntarily accompanying an officer and enlisted man of his battalion in a search of the Bois-de- Cendriere for the survivors of a battalion which had been relieved from its position in the line, he crossed an open field under terrific enemy fire a distance of six hundred yards under constant observation of the enemy, sought and found several survivors, and led them back to his own lines. Sergeant Ward was severely wounded in the performance of this hazardous deed and died of pneumonia shortly after. Residence at enlistment:1018 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y.

CORPORAL PATRICK J. CARROLL
Company F. Near Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918. Corporal Carroll led a patrol of five men to the rescue of his company commander, who was lying concealed within twenty yards of an enemy machine-gun nest. He advanced through the intense machine-gun fire to the enemy's position and, although wounded in nine places, returned to his lines with important information. Residence at enlistment: 158 East 102nd Street, New York, N. Y.

CORPORAL PETER FINUCANE
Company F. Near Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918. He voluntarily exposed himself to intense enemy machine-gun and artillery fire, crawling forward, in company with four other men of his company, in search of their wounded company commander, who had fallen a short distance in front of his company's position. After a fruitless search for the wounded officer the patrol engaged the nearest enemy post and in a fight with hand grenades destroyed it. Corporal Finucane then assisted a wounded comrade to return to his own lines. The heroic conduct of Corporal Finucane greatly encouraged the men of his company, inciting them to heroic endeavor. Residence at enlistment: 43o East 137th Street, New York, N. Y.

CORPORAL HENRY B. MACPHERSON
Company C. Near St. Juvin, France, October 16, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Juvin, France, October 16, 1918. He volunteered repeatedly during the attack on St. Juvin to carry messages through a severe enemy barrage. Throughout the action this soldier showed entire disregard for personal danger and a devotion to duty far beyond the scope of his position, accomplishing several important missions with success. Residence at enlistment: 431 Rockland Street, Abington, Mass.

CORPORAL ROBERT A. STRAUB
Company F. At Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action at Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918. Voluntarily joining a daylight patrol seeking information as to the strength and positions of the enemy which was attacked about one hundred yards beyond its own lines by an enemy hostile post of seven men. The enemy was immediately attacked from the rear, several of the men killed and the survivors scattered. A moment later another enemy post was attacked and in hand-to-hand fighting Corporal Straub killed one of the enemy and was himself badly wounded. Although unable to walk and under heavy fire from nearby enemy posts, Corporal Straub dragged himself to his lines and gave valuable information as to the disposition of the enemy forces. Residence at enlistment: 6 Hamilton Terrace, New York, N. Y.

CORPORAL AARON YAMIN
Company B. In the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27,
1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action in the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27, 1918. He displayed exceptional bravery by volunteering to cut a strip of enemy barbed-wire to make an opening for his company, which was at that time under heavy fire from artillery and machine-guns. In performing this mission this soldier received wounds from which he afterwards died. Residence at enlistment: 322 East 101st Street, New York, N. Y.

CORPORAL VINCENT P. ZIELINSKI
Company B. At St. Juvin, France, October 15, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action at St. Juvin, France, October 15, 1918. He volunteered and carried a message of vital importance in connection with the capture of St. Juvin through an intense artillery barrage, displaying courage and per-sistent devotion to duty. Residence at enlistment: 112 Gorski Street, Buffalo, N. Y.

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS THOMAS ARSENAULT
Company G. Near Bazoches, France, August 27, 1918-

For extraordinary heroism in action near Bazoches, France, August 27, 1918. With an utter disregard for his personal safety, Private Arsenault rescued a wounded officer and carried him across an area swept by a withering machine-gun fire to a dressing station, preventing the capture of a wounded man by the enemy. Residence at enlistment: Newcomb, N. Y.

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS JOHN DUFFY
Company F. At Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action at Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918. Voluntarily joining a daylight patrol seeking information as to the strength and positions of the enemy, which was attacked about one hundred yards beyond its own lines by an enemy hostile post of seven men. The enemy was immediately attacked from the rear, several of the men killed and the survivors scattered. A moment later another enemy post was attacked and in hand-to-hand fighting, Private Duffy killed one of the enemy and was himself badly wounded. Although unable to walk and under heavy fire from nearby enemy posts, Private Duffy dragged himself to his own lines and gave valuable information as to the disposition of the enemy forces. Residence at enlistment: 722 Bergen Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS RICHARD Foy
Company F. Near Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near Bazoches, France, August 14, 1918. He voluntarily exposed himself to intense machine-gun and artillery fire crawling forward in company with four other men of his company, in search of their wounded company commander who had fallen a short distance in front of his company's position. After a fruitless search for the wounded officer, the patrol engaged the nearest enemy post, and in a fight with hand grenades destroyed it. Private Foy then assisted a wounded comrade to return to his own line. The heroic conduct of Private Foy greatly encouraged the men of his company, inciting them to heroic endeavor. Residence at enlistment: 495 St. Marks Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS CARL I. JOHNSON
Company B. In the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27,
1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action in the- Forest of Argonne, France, September 27, 1918. He displayed exceptional bravery in volunteering to cut the enemy's wire and thereby make it possible for his company to advance upon the enemy. In performing this invaluable service he repeatedly exposed himself to heavy fire from enemy machine-guns and was severely wounded. Residence at enlistment: 460 Fifty-fourth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS EDWARD F. SCHMITT*
Company L. Near Mont Notre Dame, France, September 10,
1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near Mont Notre Dame, France, September 10, 1918. Voluntarily accompanying an officer and non-commissioned officer of his battalion in a search of the Bois-de- Cendriere for the survivors of a battalion which had been relieved from its position in the line, he crossed an open field under terrific enemy fire, a distance of six hundred yards, under constant observation of the enemy, sought and found several survivors and led them back to his own lines. The heroic and soldierly conduct of Private Schmitt and his devotion to his comrades greatly inspired the men of his battalion. Private Schmitt was later killed in action while gallantly fighting with his battalion in the Argonne Forest. Residence at enlistment: 22 Rex Place, Buffalo, N. Y.

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS JAMES SULLIVAN
Company H. At St. Juvin, France, October 15, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism, in action at St. Juvin, France, October 15, 1918. This soldier fearlessly entered a dugout in which he knew there were Germans singing, and single-handed captured 20 prisoners. Residence at enlistment: 333 East 41st Street, New York, N. Y.

PRIVATE JOSEPH FRANCE BROWN
Company K. Near the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27,
1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near the Forest of Argonne, France, September 27, 1918. During an attack on the trenches held by his company, Private Brown found an automatic rifle which had been abandoned by a wounded soldier. Though he was unfamiliar with the operation of the weapon, Private Brown opened fire on the enemy with it, killing two of them, and thereby making possible the escape of three of his comrades who had been captured by the enemy. The remainder of the hostile force was driven off. Residence at enlistment: Hogansburg, N. Y.

PRIVATE WILLIAM C. EVANS
Sanitary Detachment. Near Bazoches, France, August 27-28, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action near Bazoches, France, August 27-28, 1918. This soldier showed extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty by attending to wounded without rest or relief, under heavy shell fire, until he fell unconscious from exhaustion. He remained at work for two days and a half under circumstances which called for the greatest determination and courage. Residence at enlistment: Plainsville, Pa.

PRIVATE SING KEE
Company G. At Mont Notre Dame, France, August 14-15, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action at Mont Notre Dame, west of Fismes, France, August 14-15, 1918. Although seriously gassed during shelling by high explosive and gas shells, he refused to be evacuated and continued, practically single-handed, by his own initiative, to operate the regimental message center relay station at Mont Notre Dame. Throughout this critical period he showed extraordinary heroism, high courage, and persistent devotion to duty and totally disregarded all personal danger. By his determination he materially aided his regimental commander in communicating with the front line. Residence at enlistment: 61 Bayard Street, New York, N. Y.

PRIVATE GROVER C. SULLIVAN
Company L. At La Besace, France, November 5, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action at La Besace, France, November 5, 1918. He displayed rare bravery and devotion to duty by remaining on duty after being seriously wounded during a heavy artillery bombardment and giving first-aid treatment to five severely wounded comrades. Residence at enlistment: Elm Street, Norwood, N. Y.

PRIVATE JOSEPH VERCRUYSSE
Company H. At St. Juvin, France, October 15, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action at St. Juvin, France, October 15, 1918. He volunteered and carried a message to supporting troops through an intense artillery barrage, displaying courage and persistent devotion to duty. This message was of vital importance in connection with the capture of St. Juvin. Residence at enlistment: 1723 Forty-first Street, Oakland, Cal.

WILLIAM SHEFRIN *
Cook, Company C. In the Ravin de l'Homme Mort, near Vaux-
cere, France, September 5, 1918.

For extraordinary heroism in action in the Ravin de I'Homme Mort, near Vauxcere, between the Vesle and Aisne Rivers, France, September 5, 1918. After both of his feet had been blown off by a bursting shell Cook Shefrin, although mortally wounded, coolly directed the work of rescuing and caring for other wounded men of the kitchen detachment who had been wounded when his transport was struck. Residence at enlistment: 210 Seventeenth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL

COLONEL GEORGE VIDMER

For exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services. As commander of the 3o6th Infantry, he demonstrated marked ability as a military leader. His sound judgment and tireless energy were largely responsible for the successes which his regiment gained in its operations against the enemy. Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered Military Academy from Alabama.
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