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Diary of Clarence Rhebergen 305th Supply Company


The World War I diary of
Clarence Rhebergen
Supply Co. 305th Infantry,
submitted by Calvin Srock of Taylor, Michigan
 with the consent of Winnie Lewellen,
daughter of Clarence Rhebergen


P1.

Clymer NY 1917
Feb 25, 1918
Westfield   70
Dunkirk      60
Niagara Falls 185
Land Costerband  175
Rechester  1 p.m.
Lyons    1:52  some snow
Bluegrass near
Popular trees
real level and
low swampy
hills very pretty        Lycruze 2:30 pm
timber small            left 3:00 pm
New York State
Fair Grounds
sleighing
lots of ice
I make out Syracuse.

P2.

Breakfast Buffalo 10AM
15 Minutes time Laura Nacher
I have ?? Mrs .G. Wandesrcoff  ? candy

P.3

Fine barns and houses, all painted. It looks like a pretty good farm country, especially for hay. Most of the new farm houses are in the bungalow style, most all place between syracuse and utica where the regular train stop the building are long and narrow with the roof projecting about 5 feet. The sides are shingled with green stained shingles, and the platform ----.

P.4

such place, but don't stop us say are ? where the barn and large silo  pig pen and house were all built of cement block ?? roof same place the soil seems red and sandy land seems very level.wet above ? road  ?? utica at 4:00 pm Erie Canal at 5:45  it is within 4 rods of the ? NYCR

Amsterdam at 5:55pm 5 minute stop

P5
missing

P6
missing

P7
crossed erie canal Mohawk river at 6:12 we stopped on the bridge and waited for the flock, pissed in the erie canal Mohawk river. Started up again at 6:50 Got dark, then Hudson River, crossed at 8:40 PM Electric lights on the bottom of the bridge. Johnsonville at 9:15, it is 150 miles yet to Camp Devens and we still have about 20 miles in New York state yet.

P8
struck the ? through the tunnel across the Hudson river.. Supper at Greenfield, Mass. 1:25
Baldenville at 3:25 AM

Feb 26, 1918  Fitchburg at 4:50 AM

Mar 3, 1918   St. John 15, text Isiah

arrived at Camp Devens Feb 26, 1918 at 5:30 AM. Left Camp Devens March 18, 1918

P.9
inoculation
squad leader reviley

Nettie Hagenborn
Minnie Hagenborn
Minnie Rheberger
Gertrude Rheberger
Laura Nectors
Ruth Nectors
Mable Nectors
Mrs. G. Vanfderscoff
Miss Nettie Damcott
Esther Ton
Mable Ton
Denise Habint
Lena Habint
Lena Gravink
Mable Gravink
Laura Slatform
? Ricker
Nellie Rickers
? Rickers

P.10
Edward Ton
Ganett Habint
Jess Tressler
Earl Store
 C R.

Supply Co. 305th Inf.
Amex Force Via NY

P.11

Camp Devens
30th Co. 8th Batalion
Depot Bridge
Mass.
3rd squad corpal

1st platoon
St. John 15
Mar. 3 Isahiah 11:12:14
Mar. 10 " 55
Mar. 17

 283 Linden Ave.
Oil City, Penn.
Mrs. Grace Hippwell

P. 12
blank

P.13.
Colonel James B. Kemper

1st call                5:45
March and Reveille      5:55
Assembly at             6:00
Mess or B.        6:15
Fatigue                 6:45
Drill 1st Call          6:50
Assembly          8:15
Recall                  11:45
Drill 1st call          10:35
Assembly          10:45
Recall                  11:45
Mess or Dinner    12:00
Mess or Supper      6:00  retreat
Call to quarters   9:00
Taps              10:00

P.14
blank

P. 15
Boston 8 man train    Left Camp Devens, Mass.    March 18, 1918 at 2 PM

Got on train at 3:55 PM   Left the Ayrs Junction at 4:00 A fine new car, everything very clean.   Got to Ayrs at 4:20    Shirley at 4:25mPM Awful   hilly, no large timber.

First crow? railroad through   the big rocks. Not much of any farming.  Lots of stone fences. Fitchburg at 4:50 PM   Railroad center this was 10 minute stop 5:00 PM.

Comb & hairpin factory, lots of girls, big plant.

D. M. Dillon mfg. steam B make parts   hill  mill company....

P.16
big New England power house paper mill  Awful rough country, I wouldn't live there.
East Gardner 5:40 small place  Gardner at 5:45  Baldwinville 6:00 PM
They passed our supper mts at 6:20 pm   Aldon at 6:30  Starret Tool Company
Grange at 6:35, small place. Beginning to get dark  Irvin at 6:40, allmost dark.
Mohawk River at 6:57, pitch dark  This is the same place we crossed when  we came.
North Hampton 7:40 PM   Holyoke 8:00 PM   so....

P.17

We were put on an other track  changed routes  Red Cross served coffee.
First coffee we have had since we left Clymer, beautiful park
Hartford, Conn at 9:25 PM  New Haven, Conn at 10:20 PM   Lights out.
Whistle blowed at 4:45  Wake up. got off at 6:00
Breakfast at 7:45. Eggs, bacon, grape nuts.
15 Co. 152th D.B. Camp Upton New York.  308 Co. B. Johnn Dancott.

P. 18
blank

P.19
April 14,1918 Our boat is the Canopic. We started from Camp Upton at 11 o'clock. Got in Long Island City and at 5 20: AM April 15,1918, fine weather.   unloaded 14 carloads afraid 12:20 , then we got on the tug boat and went to New York City. Arrived at 3:30 and unloaded it again, at Dock. 60 and we got off at dock 61 where our boat was i****. at 9 o'clock. got our supper at 10:00 PM Hadn't found Blain W. yet at this time, That was some week,4 men killed, 38 wounded. One Lieutenant broke his leg, and there was a leg wrapped up in a quilt. The other man were all bruised up. On our way from Camp Upton....

P. 20
Because there wasn't  room for us on the seats, they picked out 15 of us men in our company for guard, and engineer the transporting from the ship onto the dock, and I was guard on the tugboat from 2:30 PM until about 6 PM. Easy work. One boat load of soldiers left at 11:15. War vessel ahead, some swell boats. Got up at 7:15 AM 16th.  Eat our breakfast, then we got our bags, made our bed, and the rest of the forenoon we layed around.

P.21
Found Blain W. and the other boys after breakfast. Our bunks are good. We have side boards on the side so the rocking of the boat won't let us fall out of bed. These side boards are taken off when we get in bed and out. We each have a life preserver at the head of our bed. Left New York Harbor at 4:15 PM 16,1918. We were all driven to our rooms 4:15 PM and we have back on the deck again at 6:15. At 6:45 we were out of.....

P. 22
lTime was changed this morning. One hour ahead of New York time.  April 17, 1918
Got up at 5:45 AM  Revelie at 6:00AM  breakfast at 7:00 AM  dinner at 12:00 AM.
After dinner we had roll call then we had rest until 2:30 PM. Then we were called out with life preserver on, rest again until 4:15 PM. Some fine ride at 11:20 PM April 16. A few of us saw the coast signal, telling our boat that the other boats were started and that meant that our boat should send out signals every 15 minutes so they

P. 23
could keep track of us, and on the April 17, they sent signals by the blow of the whistle, because it was too foggy to send signal by the cemi-floral (ed.semaphore). The waves are not very rough yet, moving very slow at the rate of 12 miles an hour. Bery few sick men yet.  April 18, 1918 Some storm, awful rough, can’t hardly walk on the  deck. Water sweeping from one side to the other . We expect to pick up some more convoyes tonight. Life boat drill at 1:30 ....

P.24
Lots of sick men now, we have changed our eating room. We see our first boat at 3:30 soon after that we saw 5 more and at 5:45 we were near enough so that they could give the zig zag signal. This is sure some interesting trip. We expect to have more ships with us before morning.  There is only one gun boat in sight yet now. We can see the soldiers on the other boats now. At 6:50 we saw the 7th boat. The waves are coming right up on the deck now. Some waves. But I like it very much. I am getting all of the ...

P25
I can look way over. April 19, 1918 Friday   Got up at 5:45 revilee. This is a fine morning. We are out on deck without a coat or cap on. We have 7 other ships with us, we didn't pick uo any more during the night, but expect to today.  I am not a bit sick yet and I don't think I will get sick either, because this is the 4th day sailing.  Our first physical training on boat every day now at 2:15 PM.  Good exercising all right. It puts life in a man The water is awful rough, can't hardly walk on deck, lots of sick .

P26
poison in his finger, and now he is sea sick. I ia an awful sickness. We see 8 more battle ships tonight. We saw them first at 6:01 PM. 2 more at 6:10 PM. This begins to look more incorrigan when we see these battle ships. These are the boats that we have been looking for for 2 days. April 29, 1918 Saturday. We have 12 ships in all now. We expect to see some more before night. For our physical training today we have boxing. Take 2 men about a size and weight . I didn't see a ....

P 27 missing

P28 missing

P29
Captain James was pretty ugly. Time is coming soon. I hope they will give me some easy fellow.  We met a boat coming from England to New York. This is 6:10 PM

we are getting pretty near the war zone now.  I am just ready to go to bed. I read the bulletin board and I am on for guard for ship for Sunday. April 21,1918 Sunday  2 more ships at 1:30 PM . I didn't see much of the outside world today because I was on guard on post no. 13.

P30
 staterooms and to the upper and lower decks, so you see I was inside most of the time. It sure is a fine moonlight night tonight.  The moon is shining awful bright on the water, and it certainly is a great sight, and also to look at the ships that are on both sides of us. But the sailors say that they rather sail in the dark at night than by because.....

P31
pretty near the war zone now, After tonight, we will have to sleep with our clothes on and our life preservers on also.  We have sailed 1780 miles and we still have 1640 miles more to sail  So you  see we're a little over half way. And I am not sea sick yet,  I am feeling fine.  Monday, April 22, 1918.  I was on guard until 9 AM this forenoon., and after that I was off until 11 AM ,and then the whistle blew and we had to all come on deck with our....

P32
We got up there and they said that we had just entered in the war zone and that we must always keep our life preservers on, so we went to dinner with them on.  And I was looking at the bulletin board and they have me picked out for one to watch out for submarines, and I guess I will have to get up in the crow's nest. That's about 80 feet from the top deck. Some  height. The sea is pretty rough, the waves are washing across the deck.

P33
what is making the men sick. It's getting pretty cold. Tonight we received a wireless that there were some icebergs floating out from the shore, and that we should be on the lookout for them. They seem to be about 100 miles away yet, but this isn't very much on a rough sea.   April 23,1918, Tuesday. We met another British boat going to New York city at 10:00 AM. We expect to meet the rest of our boats sometime today. We saw a whale at 1115 AM.  This was some sight. We saw 5....

P34
land because these birds don't go more than three days boat sailing away from land.  These birds are called (sea gulls) and another bird that looks like a sparrow.  It looks as if it lights on he water. The sea is getting pretty rough again tonight.  April 24, 1918 Monday.  Got up as usual. Didn't rest very well, because we slept with our clothes on. Raining, and an awful rough sea, and there's an awful fog also. We didn't have any ...

P35
 because the weather was bad, and the waves were washing across the deck all day, and  it's impossible to do anything. We met another British vessel today going to New York.    I think this was at 4:15 PM. We are out of danger of the submarines when it is so rough ff because they can't stay on the water to range for a shot. This is our gain. We met another British boat again tonight and 5:.40 This makes two that we met today.   April 25, 1918 Thursday. Got up at 5:45 AM didn't have revilee because the weather was too bad....

P36
across the deck. We won't have any formation today on account of the rough weather. April 26, 1918 Friday    This is a fine morning. The water is very smooth again, and  we will have our formation again today. We met four submarine chasers this morning and they are going back with us. Say, but these little boats can sail fast.  First submarine at 3:45 PM got one submarine at 4:00. We picked up 4 more submarine chasers this afternoon, We saw....

P37
saw another whale and 6:40 PM. This is some exciting time. April 27,1918, Saturday -  feeling better, got up at 5:00 AM. Today we are getting our baggage out of the hole and putting it up on deck, so when we get in harbor we will be all ready for unloading. This has been a fine day and the sea is very smooth. I think this is our last day at sea. Seen the island shore at 4:30 PM, and the Wales  Island at 6:10 PM. This has been one busy day. We also had to pack our boxes for one days rations. This box contains 1 Apple .....

P 38
good feed for one day.  April 28,1918 -  Sunday -  Arrived at Liverpool at 2:30 AM. Got up at  4:45 AM. Got in dock at 6:30 AM. All feeling fine and had a fine trip. We transferred our baggage from the boat on to the train and got through at 11:20 AM. Ate our dinner and then went to the place they call Dover.

April 29, 1918, Monday - Arrived at Dover and 3:30 AM. Unloaded our baggage again on the boat to sail across the English Channel to France where he landed was Calias.

P39
 man got sick.  April 30,1918 Tuesday - ----England shore on Tuesday--2 hours sailing time to Calais. -- We were ill treated by the English, they robbed us on our American money. Hold up a handful of money for a piece of candy and they would take most of it, the French I think used us much better. May 1,918, Wensday - In rest camp No. 6 sleeping in small tents, 12 men in1 tent. Tents are 30 inches in the ground  with sand bags around the outside. This tent is 12 feet in diameter.

P40
May 2, 1918, Thursday - ---fine. We had a 15 mile hyke, we got on our helmets, and some new --- again. These rifles are much lighter. May 3, 1918 Friday -        started from Calias at 9:10 AM and walked until 10:30.Got on a freight train and rode until  11:00 AM. The we started to walk again and didn't stop until 7 PM. We marched  through a good many small places. On our march I saw Grant Norton in the 308th Infantry. These places are all old stone and brick buildings. The place where we stopped was called Licques.

P41
We sleep right in the haymow. This trip was an awful hard one, about 20 miles we carried our packs. Only about one-fourth of the way and then the auto  trucks came and took them. May 4, 1918, Saturday - Got up at 8:15 AM.  Breakfast at 10:00 AM. I saw a farmer butcher a pig. They burned off the hair instead of scalding them off. The lay them in the straw and the light a match to it  and keep a brushing to the head of the pig. Then they scrub off the burnt hair and then they take the insides out. This is much different than we do it in  America. ---------

P42
We take the British home horses and mules and wagons. Some fine outfit to.

Go to bed before dark because we havn't any lamps. May 5,1928 - Sunday  Got up at 7:30 AM. Had our breakfast, it rained most all night and it's raining yet.  We are lucky it doesn't leak in our barn. The buildings certainly are old and some of them were built  in 1700. The roofs are made of mud and straw. And tile red. I bought 11 nails for 4c = 8 penny nails. Bought a wash dish for 29c. Lots of fun trying to tell the French what we want. May 6, 1918 Monday - Got up at 4:30 AM Moved up the road about a mile.

P43
and found a better place. We have had to build a crap house. The supply Co. is now divided into 4 companies. gin mill the next door. Rained again today. Eating with Co. K. May 7, 1918 Tuesday - Got up at 6:00 AM ate our breakfast and went to the dump house  (store house). Most of the day I was ordley (ed. orderly)  boy The roar of the cannon are awful. You hear them all night long. We expect to move again Wednesday morning May 8, 1918 Wensday - Got up at 6:00 AM Were ready to move at 7:00 AM. Up the road 2 1/2 miles,  good place. Washed and painted wagons today, Some of the boys got ----

P44
today. Fine weather today. Eating with company M now.  May 9,1918 Thursday Got up as usual. The weather is fine.  I got a team of mules this morning to drive. They rode the mule, instead of driving him. This is something new to us. The cannons certainly do roar. Last night we couldn't hardly sleep.  The British captured 18,000 men.and 3 big guns. Went down and fed mules at 8:30 PM. May 10 ,1918 Friday - Got up as usual.  I got a new team of horses. They sure are a fine pair. Black. I went down and drove them. This is sure a

P45
 new way of driving horses. Ride one and lead the other. Feed them oats at 4:30 PM Got  supper at 6:00 PM and feed horses hay at 8 PM. Cleaned part of my harness. We clean and polish them every day, wagons also.  May 11,1918 Saturday - Got up at usual time. Fed my team 6:00 AM, Ate  my breakfast at 6:45AM.  I don't have to go at out with my team today. Fed at 4:30 oats. Hay at 8:30. Got orders to take my team out  and draw ammunition. Left at 10:30 AM. Took dinner and feed along, also feed for supper. Got back again at 7:30 PM. This was along drive. I was the only one who went.

P46
 Some excitement when the wheels run off of (Aunis) limber. He went right into the ditch with my team I have got the corpral team. They sure are a fine pair. Fast riding for about two miles. May 12,1918 Sunday -  30 airplanes.  Fed my team at 6:00 AM . Cleaned my team ,watered them, cleaned stall, and then started to clean and polish my harness. Don't have to work this afternoon until 4:30 PM when we feed again. We got 15 more new me. These men help wash wagons and run behind the limber and put on the brake. May 13, 1918 Monday - Got up at 2:00 AM. Was on guard. I saw 2  German airplanes and then droped 4 bombs right near our team. This caused some excitement. The horses and men were certainly scared and some----

P47
I wasn't out with my team and all but cleaned horses and harnesses. Our old men have come back in this company again, and the men that came yesterday were discharged again. They were no good at all.   it rained all they again. The battlefield was pretty quiet today. When the airplanes when over last night their search light made it as light as day. Scared Perry, and he told us to keep inside until they were gone.  May 14,1918 Tuesday - Got up at 5:30 AM Fed my team and cleaned them up. Hitched them up at 7:00 AM   Drawed rations until 2 PM 1 1/2 hour nooning. then I hitched them up again and delivered---

P48
to Co. K and L. Got home again 4:30 PM.  Fed them oats  and cleaned off my team. Then took my harnesses apart. Ate supper at 6:00 PM and was off until 5:30 PM, when I fed them hay. I saw the biggest stallion ever saw this afternoon.  It was a dample gray weight 1900 pounds. There were 40 airplanes going over at 6:00 PM tonight. Some sight. May15,1918 Wensday - Got up at 6:00 AM. The weather is fine. Cleaned off my team and ate my breakfast. Went out with my team at 11:00 AM. Got home again at 12:30 PM.  Clean harness and packed up ? limber for morning, we -----another place.

P49

his water cart.  May 16, 1918 Thursday - Got up at 4:00 AM. Ready for another move. We moved from Clergues to Brassion 10 miles. The places we passed through  Gueny,Tournham, Bonnigues, Brassion, we got there3:00 PM. We drawed 2 loads rations and when we got in with the last load it was 10:00 PM. Hadn't had any supper yet. May 17, 1918 Friday - Got up at 2:00 AM, had ----

P 50

was ready for the other move again at 5:30 AM.  The weather is fine. One of my horses got corked during the night. We have had some hyke, 3 of the boys died on the way up. We passed through a good many small places, some of them were Estamito, Boucherie,   This all I can remember just now. We expect to camp along the roadside until morning and we will move on again. This is 5:30 PM  We thought we were set for the night but we found out we were too near the lines. So we must move again .this is 6:30 PM We moved about 3 miles away from the lines, got our supper at 10:00 PM. We slept on the ground, it was pretty good. May 18, 1918 Saturday - got up at 6:00 AM ---

deck.

P51

cleaned harnesses and at 4:00 PM I was called to one side and the Lieutenant and sergeant Sherman made me a corporal. This was some surprise I'll say. I went to the trench tonight at 8:00 PM.  we do all of our traveling in the night. The English boys leave tomorrow. On our way back we had a close call. The bombs dropped all around us, but didn't do any harm to the transports. Got home at 1:00 AM.  May 19, 1918 Sunday -  got up at 6:00 AM. Fed  team and started to clean harnesses. Went up to the trenches again. Got home at 6:00 PM. Orders were to move at once. We were ready at 7:00 PM and at 10:00 pm Johnnie seen us and we had to pull in the woods, and we will stay there until morning. The place we were at was attend Ramed st-----

P52

last night, we had a close call too. We were up to the front line trenches. We had to gert in the woods there too. We stayed there for two hours. I like my new work very much. The woods we stayed in during the night are called Appleck. We got there at 11 o'clock.  May 20, 1918 Monday At 1:30 AM we fed our teams and were ready to move out again at 4:30 AM.  We did not have much sleep .  We got in the place called Tournham at 8:00 AM. Ate our breakfast and rested until  2:00 PM. Then we cleaned off our horses,  and we got orders to move again tonight. but we don't know where we are going.  May 21,1918 Tuesday -  Got up at 6 AM, weather is ...we didn’t move fast...

P53

another regiment in the place where we were going. I only had my team out about three hours today, it was an easy day, but being a lands corporal makes a lot more work for me, but we have an awful good sergeant so that is the reason I do much for him. May 22, 1918 Wednesday  - Got up as usual. The weather is fine. Sleeping outdoors on the ground. I had my team out working in the city. This is a snap job. I had just had my wagon washed and harness cleaned. Went to bed at 12:00. May 23, 1918 Monday -Got Weather fine. We have to put ....

P54

 

 

P55

May 25, 1918 Saturday -  the ground.  But I had a new  ? canvas over me. I didn't have to go out t with my team  I haven't had my team out for 2 days, but today I let one of the other men take them out.  We changed our picket line because the mud was getting pretty deep where they were. This afternoon our sergeant broken. It certainly hurt my feeling. I wasn't out with my team, but i let another good man drive them. His name is Wantassel.  I think I will let him have my team when I take charge of my corporal place.   May 26, 1918 Sunday weather is fine.We had to work all-day washing wagons and cleaning harnesses. We are to have inspection on horses, harnesses and wagons Monday morning at 9:00 AM. We will have a parade. I worked at my harnesses and horses until 8:30 PM.  I haven't been to church since I have been in France. Went to bed at 10:30 PM.   May 27, 1918 Monday - Got up at 6:00 AM. Orders came in to send a limber to Co. L. At 6:45 so Igot ready and took my team. We went to the rifle range. This is about 8 kilometers from Tournham.

P56

We passed through Nordegue, St. Marc, Manflance, LaBalance. Crossed the quarry railroad,  got to the range at 11:00AM. Had not had any breakfast yet and don't know about any dinner yet. No dinner .Left the field at 5:30 PM. Got home at 8:30 PM. Ate my supper and when I had my team  taken care of it was dark.  May 28, 1918 Tuesday Got up at usual time. Felling fine. I didn't go out with my team today, Just then we made a Farrier so I have to drive team ??.I certainly will miss my horses which I took a lot of interest in.

P58

May 29,1918 Wednesday - Got up at usual time. Got 2 limbers out at 6:30 AM. I got orders to act as corporal. At 10:00 AM we went to Epplex. I rode a saddle horse and was in charge of the limbers. Got there at 12:45. Fed my horse and loaded up at 2:00 PM. This was a long drive, got  home again at 4:30 PM.  May 30, 1918 Thursday  - Got up at usual time, fed my team, and at 8:30 AM they told me that I had to be acting corporal again.  I put the saddle on little ginger pony and took 3 g.s. wagons to the  dump and drawed rations. Got home again at 11:00 AM. After dinner I used my team and drawed 7 loads of ammunition and got through at 9:00 PM.

P59

work in this outfit. Went to bed at 12 o'clock P. M. I also had to help engineer the  loading of the limbers for the hyke for the next day.  May 31, 1918 Friday - Got up at 3:30 AM. Fed our team ate  our breakfast at 5:00 A. M.. Ready to move at 7:30 AM. The place we are at is Tournham. We pass through Bonnique, Clereques, Licques, Schankye, and the place we are at now is Alembon.  We got there at 2:00 PM, fed teams, ate our lunch and then we went back with 3 g.s. wagons for tomorrow's rations. I went and acted as corporal again. We got home at 11:00 PM then I had to get 3 limbers to go to Schankye. We got home

P60

at  2:00 AM. When they reached here at 11:00 PM, there wasn't a sergeant for lieutenant to be found so I had to do it myself. Some work.   June 1, 1918 Saturday - Got up at  6:00 AM, fed teams, ate breakfast. and I am acting corporal again today on the ration wagons.  I drive a saddle horse   we start at 8:00 AM. Just ready to start they change me to a different trip. Now I am going to Tournham after ammunition.  Started at 9:00 AM, passed through these  places. Shankye . Licque, Croques, Clerques, LeMamel  and Guermy. The distance between Alembon and Tournham is 13 killimeters. Got home at 3:30 PM, ate my supper and at 8:30 had to get 3 limbers out to deliver rations. The saddle horse that I had hadn't been rode for 2 two weeks

P61

because he bucks and it was impossible to ride him, so I thought I would try him. It went pretty good.   June 2, 1918 Sunday - Got up at 5:00 AM, hitched up 3 teams and went to Tournham. again.  I acted as corporal again. They want me to be a full corporal but I won't take it. This is the second time they tried to make se a corporal. Started at 8:00 AM . Got home again at 3:00 PM I drove my own team and acted corporal again. Now I must wash my harnesses. June 3,1918 Monday  - Got up as usual time, 5:45 AM. Acted corporal, went to Tournham with 3 limbers after ammunition. We got the hull of it now. Got home at 3 ;00 PM. When I got home they wanted me to go to  Licque to see Capt.

P62

Butler. Got home again at 8:00 PM, the I took a g.s. wagon back again to Licque after supplies. It was pretty late then.  I had to help load the limbers for the manover for Tuesday morning at 4:30 AM. The lieutenant Maher told me that he would give me till Tuesday morning to sew my strips on, but Il haven't done it yet, nor do I intend to. Jun 4,1918 Tuesday - Got up at 4:00 AM, fed teams, ate my breakfast, at 4:15 AM. Ready to pull out at 6 AM, traveled until 12:00 PM. Ate our dinner and rested until 1:00 PM. Had to change horses. My horse lost a shoe. Put it back on when we ate dinner  I shod horses until 12:30 AM. This is the first shoeing I have done while

P63

I have been in the Army.  I have got so I can do most anything going. 

June 4, 1918 Wednesday - Got up at 3:30 AM, fed our team, ate our breakfast, started out for rifle range at 4:30 AM. Got there a t2 ;00 PM, ate our dinner and on the way up. At noon I shod 2 horses. One pulled his shoe on the picket line and mine lost it on the way up. June 6,1918.  Thursday - Got up at 4:30 AM and fed team, ate breakfast, and took f5 teams and drawed  ammunition from Allembon to Licque. When I got there they put Elliott and myself in the headquarters transport for this long hike. We started at 11:00 AM, got there at ?.

P64

we went 18 miles the first day. We sleep in a two wheel cart, this was some hard bunk. June 7, 1918 Friday - Got up 4:30 AM, fed team, ate breakfast,  and started out againat7:30. These are some of the places we passed through. Wriques, Brunebert, Selles, Velinchem, Lottingham, Ergny. We got to Lifiez at 7:30 . Fed team and rested until next morning. June 8.1918 Saturday -  got up at 5:00 AM ready to start at 7:30 AM. We had an awful hard day we traveled until noon and   could see the city where we stayed overnight. It was climbing up the mountain. The road keep a winding from right to left, and at 12:15 PM we stopped

P65

for dinner and we could look down on the city. Our horses were all most tired out, We took one hour nooning,  and started out again. We passed through these places, I must have forgotten the  names of the places. We got to the place they ----At 4:30PM we drove 2 miles to water our horses we fed our team at 5:00PM, ate our supper. We had corn, milk, cheese, marmalade, coffee,  bread. This is what we have lived on since we have been in France,  hard tack also. June 9, 1918 Sunday - Got up at 6:00 AM, fed team, ate our breakfast and had half-day. After dinner we washed wagons until 5 PM, fed team, ate supper, and are going to leave for the station at 2 :00 PM . Shipping horses and wagons to American base. We are going there also, this is a

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job.This is 7:00PM,  ready to go to bed until 1:00 PM. The I feed my team and be ready to go. Got new  orders, we are going at 10:00 PM now. W started at this time and got there at 1:30 AM. We put our horses and limbers right on the cars..6 horses in a small car. The drivers sleep with their horses. I had to take my team out of the first car because they began to crowd and my best horse got down and hurt his legs. I put them in with 4 other mules, they seem to be all right now. We had our cars loaded at 3:30 AM. Started at 3:45 AM.  June 10, 1918 Monday- Sleep with my team, 4 men in this car. There was only about 5 feet for us to sleep on, then the horses keep hitting us with their front feet. I got steped on

P67

during the night, but noting very serious. We fed our team at 6:15 AM, ate our breakfast, then we road on until 12:00 AM. Then we fed again. We had to hold the hay up for the horse because they couldn't get their head down because they had their head tied up so they couldn't lay down. Stopped again at 4:15PM, met a train with french, belgium, and english soldiers going to paris on furlough. They had their wives and sweethearts with them, going for a good time. I am still with the 

Hqs. Battalion until the march is over with. The place we took the train was Hesdon June 11, 1918 Tuesday - Sleep with the horses again and about 12:00 AM the train made an awful stop and the horses and mules clashed

P68

right together. Say, but this made some excitement I'll say. We all got a hit from the horses, but no bones broken.  Just knocked a little skin off my of my left hip where my horse stepped over me.  We fed oats at 6:30 AM, ate our breakfast and laid down and slept again.This sure is some life, but I am feeling pretty good. I have lost about 18 pounds since I've left Camp Upton. June 12, 1918 Wensday - Sleep with the horses again. We are getting use to it now. Some of the palces we have passed through are these. We started from Hesdon, Lifieq. Melun, Bos De Louiey, Thomery, Marret de Saint Mannes, Montereau. Ate dinner here.

P69

port sur yomma sens, Etigan, Veron,Tunil. De Saul.cejy, Buvett,Jaingny, Brsenn,Auxon,,Jeuny, Brevonney, Mathaux, Nancy. This is some big city,we apssed througha good many more places but I didn't get time to put them down. We got off at -   June 13, 1918 Thursday Sleep with horses again.We fed at 6:30 AM not much oats or food left for the men. We got off at Choctel. We are at ---oyment this is aplace where lots of wood is shipped from.

P70
June 14, 1918 Saturday - Got up at 6:30 AM. No feed for horses. This makes three weeks that our horses haven't had any oats. They only had one feed of hay a day, I haven't had the harness on them since we landed here.  They looked awful gant. I don't know why we can't get any oats or hay. June 15, 1918 Saturday  - Got up at 6:15 AM. No feed yet. so I took my team out in a Frenchman field and let them eat grass. No feed for dinner and they are beginning to get crazy. The flies are something awful out here. The nearly make you wild. I am cleaning harnesses for today. I expect to go back to my own battalion again in a few days. I hope so because I am better

P71

there, we had an awful close call of being shot this morning. Someone fired a shot in the picket line and it came pretty near 4 or 5 fellows. They sure were scared and we don't know where the shot came from I heard the shot and the bullet whip past me,  but don't know what direction  it came from. Had to steal for our horses. going some, we also caught a cow and milked for another bright stunt. This is the real army life. I had one of my horses shod today and will have the other shod tomorrow.  June 16, 1918 Sunday -  Got up at 6:30 AM, fed team. didn't do any work all day. After dinner

P72

... and myself went saddle riding and got back at 4:30 PM. We went to a lumber camp that was  about two miles back in the woods. The people there lived in small huts made of logs. They were sure surprised to see American soldiers. They didn't seem to know what we were up to. So  we told them that we were just joy riding. This certainly was a fine trip. .I had one of my team horses,   and Erb had one of his team mules. June 17, 1918 Monday - When we got up it was raining. After breakfast we looked for barns to put our horses in. After that we our bunks in the barn where our horses were, and ... place where I keep my harnesses. The Frenchman was trying to...

P73

is open, so I motioned to him and told him that I would make him one, so I when at it. There was about 8 of the other  teamsters looking on, but this didn't seem to affect me any. I got through about 3:30. Had it all ready to put on the wagon. This pole was hued out of a small tree or pole.  I got 2 eggs for my pay Ha Ha.  That's the average Frenchman wages per day.  June 18, 1918 Tuesday - The weather was fine again but not much work today. After dinner I was put on wood detail , three teams -  Augustine, Erb, and myself. This was in a swamp. Some mud, I'll say.We put 4 horses on one wagon until we got in the road, but I pulled out alone. Got in at 6:00 PM.

P74

The order was then that we had to hand to pull right out for the front trenches, so we loaded up and  were ready at 7:00 PM,  but the other companies didn't get ready until 9:30 PM so we had to wait for them.  June 19, 1918 Wensday -At midnight we reached a big hill and it took us 2 1/2 hrs. to get the whole transport up the hill. I pulled my load up all alone without any trouble, but I had to   take my team back to the foot of the hill and help the others up. This certainly made my team tired and one of the machine gun g.s.wagons got hung up and they put on 6 horses on it and couldn't pull it out of the ditch.  I told them that if would take their 6 off I would put ....

P75

at me, and my captain he will surprise you fellows. So I put my team on and I pulled it out of the ditch alone,  and when I got it in the road they put on one team ahead of mine and we pulled it up the hill. This time ahead was Augustine,  he had a good team also. We got to the next team the next morning at 5:15 AM. On our way every village had been boomed. This sure was some sight to see. Q whoe city ruined with shells.  June 20, 1918 Thursday  - This was a fine morning. Didn't do much work all day. Went to bed at 7:30 PM.  June 21, 1918 Friday - . Got up at 6:15 AM The weather is pretty wet again. Didn't do anything this forenoon.

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dinner I drawed water. Got done at 5:00 PM. cleaned my team off after supper. Not much work in this battalion H.D.8 June 22, 1918 Saturday - Got up at 6 AM. The weather is still wet, it rains 15 minutes  and then the sun shines again. Very changeable. All of the regiment supplies are confined again today. Some change I'll say. but I think it's for the best. I gave my team some wet grass this morning and he had a touch of the colic, but it didn't last very long. This afternoon I started after mail at 2:30 PM and it was 14 kilimeters. Got home again at 8:00 PM. This was some drive, believe me. In this trip Igot one letter from N. H. This paid for the whole trip.

P77

June 23,  1918 Sunday - Got up at 5:30 AM. Got ready to move up to the front line trenches. We started at 1230. Got there at 6:00 PM. Fed team, ate supper and started out again. This means all night again for me. Yesterday Guy Smith lost one of his horses with bowl trouble. Got home at 3:00 AM.  June 24, 1918 Monday - Got up at 6:00 AM, fed team, ate my breakfast and laid down a couple of hours. A German airplane has been sailing over us this morning. This is some excitement. They have shot at him a good many times, but he still keep sailing on. This must be a ticklish feeling up there when they are shooting night at him.

P78

After dinner I hitched up my team and drawed 5 loads of rations from the dump, got through at 5:30. Fed my team and ate my supper.  I hitched up again and delivered rations to Co. B  up to the front  trenches. This is the first trip up the lines for the 305th Infantry Supply. We started at 6:30 PM. Had some excitement,  we had 2 gas attacks and a little shell fire. No one was hurt. Got home again at 6:20. This makes 3 nights that I haven't had much sleep. One night it was 2:00 o'clock, one  3:00 o'clock and last night I was out all night. I sleep from 9:30 AM until 12 noon. it seems funny to try and sleep in the daytime.

P79

June 25, 1918 Tuesday - Got home at 5:20 AM, fed team, ate breakfast, and went to bunk at 9:30 AM. Sleep until 12:00 AM. Got up again at 12:00 AM. Hitched up my team and and went to Baccarrat  after ammunition. Got back at  7:15 PM, fed team, ate supper, and then took the ammunition up to the front lines again.  I got back at 3:15,  this is a life without any sleep. June 26,1918 Wensday - Got up at 6:00 AM, fed team ate my breakfast and I'm getting ready to hitch up again. This is 8:30 AM.  I was not out very long this time, I went to bed at 9:00. I seems pretty good to. We were issued a new outfit today. This will get rid of the cooties I hope.

P80

June 27, 1918 Thursday - Got up at 6:00 A. M., fed team, as usual. This morning I took a good bath in the creek, put on my new uniform. It feels much better to. Hitched up my team and drawed        rations to the 3rd Battalion This is  5:20 PM and tonight I drawed  rations to the front lines again.  This means another long day again. Started for the lines at 8:00 PM. There was some bombarding again tonight. Our Leutenant got scared out, he went down the line like a scart rat.

Shells dropped within forty feet of the road. This is getting pretty close I'll say. June 28, 1918 Friday , Got home at 3:20 AM and

P81 - P84 missing

P85

got up again at 8:00 AM. Not a very long sleep.  I have been signed to a new wagon. It's a French wagon and there's only 2 wheels, but we put on 2 horses. This is some rig When these wagons were sent here, the  Lieut. Captain and the top sargent wanted me to help them hitch one of the horses to one of them.  Captain picked out a white horse and said lets hitch this one up. so we did, some fun. Well first we had a time rigging up the harness and after we had the horse hitched up it wouldn't go. The Lieut was driving it and pretty soon be used the whip and the horse went in a circle.

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himself and we had some time getting him unhitched. After the horse got up, the lieutenants says Let's put it away, and the Captain nearly This was the night I was the corporal of the guard. These Lieutenants. names where Barlow and Bradley,. Captain Butler and Sgt. Kanana. June 29,1918 Saturday - Got up at usual time, fed as usual, went and drawed rations again. Then I help rig up 12 of these French harnesses and wagons ,,and tonight I go to the front lines again. We also have  another such horse, this is Sullivan's horse. I think he will make it ....

P87

sets in now, it's nearly dark now and must start for the front lines with rations. June 30, 1918 Sunday - Got home at 2:15 AM, not very much excitement. We had one gas attack but not very heavy. Went to bed at 2:45 AM.  got up again at 6:00 AM, stood reveille, fed my team, ate breakfast, and then went back to bed until 11:00 AM. Got up again, watered team, ate dinner and got my wagon ready to go to the lines again. Started away at  8:30 p.m. not much doing tonight. They tried to do some shelling but it didn't do much damage. Got home at 3:00 AM and went to bed and the weather was..

P88

does every since the warm weather has set in. July 1, 1918 - Monday - Got up at 6 AM, fed team ate breakfast and went to bed at 9:30 AM until 11:00 AM got up, fed team dinner, got my harness fixed, I broke one of my traces on my new set of harnesses. This was the third time I used it. I am  going to the front lines again tonight with officers packs. The f1st battalion move out of the first-line trenches back to the reserve trench and the 2nd battalion move up to the 1st line and the 3rd  move up to the 2nd line trench.  I got home at 2:30 AM went to bed, got up at 7:00 AM. Late to Revile. This is the first morning at that. there wasn't anything said about it

P89

Go to bed again, I am going to go up to the 1st line again tonight, I am sure getting more than my share of the night work, I'll say.  July 2, 1918 Tuesday -  got up at 6 AM revilea at 6:15 AM, cleaned up my wagon and harnesses, laid down until 1:15 PM. Fed team ate dinner, and got orders that every team had to go out again tonight.  I am going to draw rations I guess. The German airplane dropped a bom near our picket line and the pieces of the shell went clear over my wagon where I was sleeping. I had just got in my wagon to go to sleep when the bom fell  The guard on the picket line came running over

P90

scared half to pieces .... says to him duck before he dropped another one, but the machine guns made it pretty hot for him  so he didn't stay long.  This shell dropped within 30 feet of the storehouse where the French gas shells are kept. Pretty close call, I'll say. Got home at ..July 3, 1918 Wednesday - got up  at 5:30 AM, fed team ate my breakfast, the weather is fine. The lieutenant called off some names who might go back to bed until 1:15 PM , my name happens to be one of them. When I got up again the lieutenant said to me I am going to give you a rest  now for a while, so you drive Co. L. kitchen, this is the company that moved up ....

P91

The place is .....horses, I hitch up at 5:30 AM and take the kitchen up to the line, and get back again at 7:00 AM. The I hitch up again 11:30 to take the dinner up to the boys in the trenches, and then again at 4:30 to take their supper up to them. July 4,  Thursday - Got up to 4:30 AM fed my team and ready to hitch up at 5:15 AM to take the boys breakfast to them in the trench. Again at t 11:30 AM and 4:30 PM. I get through work at about 8:30 PM. I gave my team a soap bath again today. This sure makes a lot of difference on my team. I sure have a fine team, but they are a little afraid of bom shells. The road that we travel, are all shelled to pieces, one of the kitchen teams fell in one of the bom holes today and skinned...

P92

his head and 2 hind legs. This horse happens to be a blind one, and the driver was a poor driver at that. We were gassed again last night. We also had to get up at 2:15 AM, and fall out with rifle, ammunition,  steel helmet, and gas mask. The report came from the front line that every man should fall out and be ready to help because the Germans were trying to break the line. We went to bed again at 3:15 AM.  Our celebration for today wasn't very much. We had a football game between the French and a American boys. The Americans won. Also a baseball game between the 305th machine guns and the 305th engineers. The machine guns won the game. The score was 7 to 6  This sure was

P93

a fine game. The YMCA man was the referee.  July 5, 1918  FRIDAY - got up at 4:30 AM fed all of the kitchen and water cart horses, and was ready to hitch on the kitchen and 5:45 AM. Got back from the Lines at 8:15 AM, then I went to the place they call Montingy. This is 8 killimeters from here.  (Vaxainville). Got back again at 11:00 AM, then I hitched on the kitchen and went to the trenches again. Got back at 2:00 PM,  fed my team and ate my dinner, Then I hitched up again and went to Pettonville. Got back at 4:00 PM, waited until 5:00 PM took supper to the Lines again and got back at 6:15 PM, and when I got back, Elber's mule pulled a shoe and I had to nail it back on.

P94

I am a Jack at all trades in this Army. This makes 4 shoes I have put on in the last three days.  I am also a veterinary when we are away from the regimental transport. There are four of us fellows here in this place, 2 kitchens, 2 water carts, Elber mules, Aunis mules, little heavy drafts, Rhebergen heavy drafts.  July 6, 1918 Saturday -  Got up at 4:30 fed team, hitched up at 5:45 AM went to the Lines again, got back at 7:45 AM. Then I went to Pettonville after some bombs or hand grenades, Got back at 10:00 AM ,put my team in the until 11:00 AM ,aThen I hitched up again to go to the trenches again. Got home again at 1:30 PM, hitched in until  4:30, then I went to the trenches again. Got home at 6:00 PM.

P95

Last night at 1:45 AM the gas alarm rang and we had to put on our gas masks and then run down stairs and put on 8 horse gas masks. This was some job in a dark.  One mule went to fighting with his front feet, but we got it on all right. We had to leave them on for about 30 minutes. We sure had some fun with one of the cooks of Co. K.   He said he couldn't breathe and it was because he had got so excited he forgot to put on his nose piece.  It tickled me so that I had to take off my mask for a second, but the gas didn't effect me any. July 7, 1918 Sunday - Got up at 5:15 AM over slept a little on account of being gassed 3 times during the night. 11:45 PM,  1:30 AM and 3:00 AM.  This sure spoils a man's sleep, I'll say.

P96

July 8, 1918 Monday - Got up at 430 A. M. Fed team and took the breakfast up to the boys in the trenches. They moved up about 2 kilimeters during the night. At 11:00 AM I went up to the lines again. Got  back at 3:00 PM The Germans shelled the road that we had to travel. They shelled  about one mile of it. The Americans and French fired over100 big shells during the day. They also brought down an airplane. This is a good day's work, I'll say. Delivered supper again to the boys.  Started at 4:30 PM  Got back at 7:15 PM. This was another fine day again. I also had to shoe one of the Littles horses tonight. They all seem to want me to do the shoeing whenever...

P97(recorded on P 190)

July 9, 1918 Tuesday -  Got up at 5:00 AM, fed my team, ate my breakfast and took the breakfast up to the boys in the trenches, got back at 8:15 AM.  Put my team in and laid down until 10:30 AM fed my team for dinner, took dinner to boys at 11:00 AM . Got back at 2:00 PM. rested until 3:30, fed team again. Started with supper to boys at 4:15 PM, Got back at 7:00 PM. The 3 and 4 platoon releave the 1 and 2 platoon at tonight at 8:30 PM.  I sure had some fun with some small kids here. I was fooling with them and they had three doll carriages with dolls and after I had fooled with them a while, I put on my gas mask when they were not looking, and when they saw this,they left their dolls and carriages behind, and pretty soon an old French lady came running out the back door and talked  at the rate of 240 clip,  but I don't know what she said ....

P98

July 10, 1918 Wensday - The weather is fine and am feeling fine also. Made my 3 regular trips to the boys in the trenches. On my trip this noon I had an accident. My horse fell through the bridge going across a large trench. This trench was about 10 feet wide and about 4 feet deep. The horse that I was riding had some time getting out. It was because I was on his back and i  didn't dare

P99

jump off because the other horse would loose his balance, and fall back in the trench, but we soo got them out without many bruises. It's funny they don't get bruised up more than they do, the way we drive through woods, and across trenches and through crooked wire entanglements. I also had a fast ride on a pair of mules. I drove a pair that wouldn't go for the driver who draws the water   wagon.  They were about 1 1/2 hour trying to get one mile away from the barn, so when I got back the driver says Corpral you try and drive that team down to the water fountain, so I was fool enough to help him out so I got on the big mule..

P100

and the fun began. Well he tries to throw me off first, and he didn't make out at all,  then he tried to kick but nothing doing. I fooled with him for straight 30 minutes and I didn't get more than 3 rods away from the barn, and all of a sudden he started and say, how they did run but I let them run and when I stopped them everything was fine. I started them off and they filled w. carts and took it up to the trenches, and took another load up to kitchen without any trouble at all. By this time it was time for me to go with my kitchen up to the boys again. Got back at 1:45 PM shaved and put another bandage on my foot again.

P101

July 11, 1918 - Thursday Got up at 4:30 AM . Went to the trench with breakfast at 5:00 AM. Got home at 7:45 AM hitched up again at 11:00 AM. Not much news today. Again at 5:00 PM supper to boys again Got home at 7:00 PM. This is the last trip in this line of trenches, they move up a line closer again and 9:30 PM tonight  I drew kitchen up to the lines. Got there at 2:00 AM stayed with boys overnight.  July 12, 1918 Friday - Got up at 7:00 AM fed team, and was just ready to eat my breakfast, and the captain said to me you pull your horses out of here as soon as you can get them out. This is no place for your horses. So I pulled to the town they called Pettonville. the place I left the kitchen.

P102

This is the foot my horse stepped on about three days ago and almost broke the arch of my right foot, but it hasn't laid me off yet. The Sargent said that I should not work because it gets worse and I would have a broken arch anyway, but I am still working and expect to keep on. Took supper up to the boys at 4:45 PM. Got home at 6:15 PM. Went to a YMCA moving picture show. is sure was fine. Got home at 9:45 PM. This is the first moving picture show I've went to since I left camp Upton. It was run by the French. we had six reals. they were most all love pictures where a fellow had an awful job getting the girl he wanted. That's often the case, I'll say.

P103

is called Minginville. This place is all blown to pieces. hardly a place to leave the kitchen. The place I am at now, there isn't anything to do at all, except to take care of my team and myself .      I have been put in charge of all the horses on this picket line. There are 32 horses here, these are saddle horses and kitchen and water cart horses, this isn't much extra work tho. July 13, 1918 Saturday - got up at 6:00 AM, feeling fine. Jerry sent over a few shells during the night and shelled our road near the town. He was trying to hit our picket line, But he didn't make out. This afternoon he started to shell again at 4:30 PM

P104

to us the shaprils came right in the picket line, we could hear the shell coming. He dropped about 20 shells right near the next city where the reg. headquarters is. One shell dropped right on the roof and blew the building all to pieces while we were looking at the building. This caused a little excitement for us.  July 14, 1918 Sunday - This is a holiday for the French. This is to celebrate the day when France became a republic in18??  July 14. The French are sending shells over all day in celebration. Some day for them.  the German started bombing this place again this  afternoon at 4:00PM .......

P105  -  P108  missing

P109

every day we walk around here with helmet, gas mask, rifle, bayonet, and belt and ammunition. If he keeps this up the 305 transport boys will kick the living gas out of him.  We are called the dizzy  supply and fighters, because any one tries to start an argument we fly into them. Capt. Butler said he would put his men against any infantry and stand them 2 to1 and they could lick them. He said he would bet his one year's wages. He says he doesn't dare argue with them himself, but he said that they've done the most work of any transport unit. He felt proud of them that they were such men .....

P110

Ha, Ha, some opinion.  what do you say they also have the best teamsters in this outfit.  July 15, 1918 Monday - Got up at 6:30 AM fed team and help make breakfast. We boys are doing our own cooking while we are in this place Pettonville. Some fun I'll say. Jerry didn't send any shells over today, but the French and Americans sent over about 35 or 40 shells, but no respond from the (Bus) (ed. Boche) as the French call them. I went to the infirmey tonight to have my foot dressed where  I got stepped on about two weeks ago. This cut was about 3 inches long it with healing up fine, but  about 1 1/2 inches of it seemed to be poisoned and it pained me an awful lot, but they fixed it up now so I guess it will come all right.

P111

Now a little fight was pulled off this morning between two drivers, Murphy and John Reinard. Murphy  hit John and he went over on his back in the creek. He bled like a stuck hog, and he was pretty quiet too, I'll say. He is a good fellow to. July 16, 1918 Tuesday - In the night they done some shelling from both sides, but no damage done to us over here. I had little argument with Major Medcalph about keeping water trough clean, he was supposed to have a guard at the tough to keep it clean, so we could water our horses there, because they wouldn't let us water them in the creek. I went to him 4 times the last time I went up and told him that I couldn't get any results from him and that I was

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going to someone who could give me some results. Say that that started him off, I'll say. But I won out, he had a guard out there within 20 minutes, and have had every since. I told him that I was held responsible for the these horses, and I didn't have the money to buy a horse if he died on this account.  July 17,1918 Wenesday - Got up at 5:30 AM, fed all the and got shaved up and was ready to go to Asariel to to see our new bunch of horses, 41 mules and 44 horses and get my mail We sure have a good looking bunch. The  leutenant told me that I should come down tomorrow and help pair them up, and fit harnesses to them. This will be some business, I'll say.

P113

three horses shod today when I went to Aszarel  and I got home at 5:15 PM. This sure was one hot day in France. The Germans sure lost very heavily in this drive on the strong front. July 18, 1918 Thursday - This front is called the Vogses Mts. front. This morning when we got up it was raining and I left my ammunition belt and steel helmet just outside the tent.This is the first time I ever left anything outside of my tent and it had to rain. But this is a warning for me again.  I didn't do very much work today. It rained more or less all-day. At 5:30 PM there came a rumer  that Co. L kitchen was going to be moved. This was my kitchen, I waited until 9:00 PM  and I didn't get any

P114

word to go up there, so I went up to the ordley room to find out, and sure enough ,I had to go up, but the ordley boy had forgotten to deliver the order to me, so I harnessed my team and went up there. I got there at 11:30 PM, I moved Co. L. kitchen to Co. M. and Co. M. kitchen to Co. L. So  Co. L. has got an American kitchen now. This was the first time that my team was ever hitched to a doubletree and they sure cut up some funny capers, but they soon cooled down to business when they found out that they had to pull it anyway.  Got home at 2:30 AM. Just as I got my team hitched on  the picket line the air raid began. Say but this was some noise. they kept this up until about 3:30 AM, and the heavy artillery started.

P115

Well, this was the most noise I have ever heard. Everything seemed to shake. The shells were dropping all around us, but none of them dropped in our picket line. July 19, 1918 Friday - Got up at 6:30 AM, fed team, ate breakfast, water my team, and laid down again until 11:30. Got ready for dinner. After dinner, Arnas, Smith, Delpersio, Little and myself  went swimming. we sure had some fun. Got back at 4:20 PM. Laid down again until 5:00 PM. We go swimming two or three times a week. This place where we go now is a river that comes from the Vosges  mountains. This is also called the Vosges front. This is the front that we are holding. This mts. is where the  Germans are fighting for it.

P116

It contains iron, coal, gold, and steel. This is the main place where they get their war supplies. July 20, 1918 Saturday  - This morning at about 2:30 AM they began to use their artillery and machine guns. Say but this sure was some noise. It nearly made some of our men wild. The Germans only sent back about 10 shots all night. I am beginning to think that they are nearly done with. I hope so anyway. The first battalion move out of the first line, and the second battalion move up in their place.  And the 3rd move up in the 2nd line. We start this move at  9:00 PM. I went swimming again today. The water sure was fine. Smith, Raymond, Garnis, myself

P117

Got back at 3:30 PM. Got back to Azarial after the moving at 3:00 AM. This makes about 20 days as I've been away from this picket. They want me to drive 4 in hand teams now, but I told them that I didn't want to, unless they gave me some good horses. I don't know what they will do yet.  Jul. 21, 1918 Sunday - Got up at 10:15 AM. Didn't do any work all day except pitch my tent with Edward Arnas . July 22, 1918 Monday - Got up at 5:30 AM. Revilea at 6:00AM. Took team to water. I rode one of them bare back and they run away with me right in the creek up to their backs. This is where I got wet to, I'll say. This is the way I like to have my team feel.

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Went swimming again. Wallice, Erb, E. Arnos, the officer's cook , and myself. Started at 6:00 PM , got back at 7:15 PM. This sure was some sport, we won't be able to do this here very much longe(r), because the whole regiment moves about Saturday. The rumer is that we are going to the Italian front. After we come back from swimming we went to the Y.M.C.A. doings. Say but this was fine. It was made up of funny songs, speaches, and the old southern donkey songs. One fellow was painted like a negro, there were 3 men, 2 of them made the funny speaches, and one plaid the piano. Say but those 3 men could sure sing. We got home at 9:15 PM. July 23, 1918 Tuesday - Revilea ay 6:00 AM  The same thing over again, but it was raining when we got

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up this morning. And it has rained most all day, this afternoon I hitched up and drawed limber g.s. and ration carts down to the dump to get ready to take to the trenches. Got through at 4:30PM  hitched up again at 9:00 PM,  went up to the lines. Had some fun coming home, I'll say. I run  horses with Barrett, he had a pair of mules on a ration cart, and I had my team on a limber ,we run them from Hafenville to Aserail hill. After we have started in good speed, we caught up with the Lt. Bershal, Corpral  Mearbe, and Sgt Bready, We didn't know that there were on the at all, but we didn't stop. We pulled right by them as fast as our horses could gallop, and I won the race. Say but this was some race.This is the fastest ride I ever had. The Lt. never said a word to me about it

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July 24, 1918 Wednesday - A few changes have been made again. We are divided in battalions again, and I am in the same battalion that I was before, but this time Idon't have any horses to drive. I've been made a corporal in this battalion. This makes the second time that they have tried to make me be a corporal. The first time I turned it flat down.  and this time there isn't any chance to turn it down.  July 25, 1918 Thursday - I was corporal over the 3rd battalion kitchen. Getting ng American kitchen in the place of the English, and I am having some time getting them. Today I went to Baccarat and got one for a company I.  Got home and 11:45 PM, we hitched 4 mules on it and say but this was some

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excitement. Only had one driver after we got on the main road. Going downhill, the mules started to run away. The way we stopped them was I took my saddle horse and drove crosswise ahead  of the leaders and keep swaying  my whip in ther faces. This as the only way we could stop them. Say but the driver sure was scart some. His name is  (cook). July 26, 1918 Friday - corporal and I took 12 horses and one ration cart to get 3 kitchens, and  when I got there I couldn't get any at all, so this trip was no good to me.Got home at  7:45 PM.  July 27 Saturday - Took 4 mules, one ration cart and went 5 miles beyond Merville. Tthis is about 10 miles from Gollinard and Gallincan is 1 1/2 mile from

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Azerial. So this makes about 11 1/2 mile one-way. We got one kitchen from the 302nd Engineer Co. B. Started at 7:00, and got home at 4:00 AM. This was a hard night's work and I nearly fell asleep on my horse. The worst of it was when I got to Merviller, I had no password , so the guard called the corporal of the guard, and he called  the Sgt. of the guard, and they had to take my name, position in rank, and what rank  i was from, and  who my superior officers and where I was from , before I can get through. After it was straightened out, they gave me the password and it was (Nelson). July 29, 1918 looking after different things to get ready to...

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again  went to bed at 11:45 PM.  July 30, 1918 Monday - Took 12 wagons and went ahead to the place where we are going to get billets for the kitchens and cooks, and a billet for the ammunition dump, and a picket line for the horses and men. Passed through 6 different towns. These are the main places Glonville, Dumptall, Lt. Piermont.  The place where we are at is called Bayon 14 killimeters from Azerial. The place where we landed is called  (   ) The  train that I had with me is called the ammunition train,  and I had to take them back to Azerail again tonight and we got back at 2:00 AM . I met  my Lieut. on the way back. He sure is a fine man.

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July 31, 1918 Tuesday -  took 4 ration carts and 2 g.s. wagons to Azerail for rations.This is 14 miles from the place we are at just now. Got to Azerail  at  9:15 AM and started back at 1 PM.  Got home at 6:45 PM.  August 1, 1918 Wednesday - Got up at 6:00 AM started for Azerail  again at 7:30 AM. Got there at 10:15 AM.  started from here again at 3:00 PM got to Bayon at 6:30 PM.   This is a pretty long ride for one fellow to take every day, but there are different  wagons that go   everyday.  But I've  went every day so far yet. Augest 2, 1918 Thursday - Got  up at 6:00 AM Started for Azerail  again at 7:30 got there at 9:45 AM. Left here at 3:15 PM got home at  7:00 PM

Some excitement, 2 fellows got into a

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a fight during the day, and at night one of these fellows got sick and they had to give him a hypodermic to keep him going.  August 3, 1918 Friday - Started for Azerail again at 7:30. On my way down they sent an orderly down to tell me that we were to move again tonight. This means a double dose for us. Got to Azerail at 9:15 AM started back again at 4:00 PM Got to Bayon at 7:15 PM, fed team and started out again for the place they call Xermanenil. This is 15 kilometers from Bayonne and Bayon is 14 kilometers from Azerail , so this makes tme 29 kilometers that I rode my horse, including the trip from Bayon tp Azerail . This makes 43 kilometers and I wasn't the only one that was tired, but my horse was also.

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pretty tired to, I'll say. We got there at4:00 PM. I didn't go to bed at all,  because the Leutenant didn't come along with us, and I had to take three g.s. and 3 limbers back to Bayon to get the baggage that was left behind with The Leutenant, we started out at 8:30 AM, Got to Bayon  at 12:15 PM . Met the Leutenant  and loaded up our wagon and started back. I rode the Leutenant's horse and he rode on one of the g.s. wagons. We got home at 6:15 PM and I am all in now, and my bunk for the night is in a horse manger, not very good bunk at that. We are ready to move again in the morning.  August 4, Saturday  - G,ot up at 6:38 AM thinking of moving again Cpl. David and myself to 12 of the rigs to

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the next place they call  ------. We got there at 3:45 PM. I stayed here and corpral David went back and I stayed with the boys at this place. The other transport got there at 11:00 PM. this transport is composed of kitchens, water carts, company carts. I got back to bed at 11:45 PM. Sleept under the wagon with (Or nas) my old bedfellow.  August 5, 1918 Sunday - Got up at 7:00 AM Fed our horses, ate breakfast. Didn't do any work all day except I run across a pretty nice girl here in a hotel. The nicest girl I've seen since I've been in France. I am in charge of the transport today because of the other fellow's day off ,so I can't stay away very long at a time. But the boys are all pretty good about

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it.  August 6, 1918 Monday - Got up at 6:00 AM. The order was changed again. We are not moving today. I'm glad of it. We had to go about 6 killimeters for rations today. I don't know the name of the place. Started away at 8:30 AM. Got home at 7:30 PM, some wait for rations, I'll say. We are  all ready to move tomorrow, we expect to go in two trains. The first train leaves at 12:00 PM ,the second train at 1 PM unless the orders are changed. Corpral  David and myself had conference with our Leutenant doping out how to make this move without any trouble.

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August 7, 1918 Got up at 4:45 AM Fed teams, and was ready for chow at 5:30 AM. We got ready to move and ready to start the first train at 10:30 AM. dinner last and horses harnessed. Lt Austin, and corpral  David take the first train and I take the second train all alone. The time was changed in moving. The first train leaves at 11:30 AM and my train don't leave until 7 PM. We are about 5  killimeters from the loading place. About 1 1/2 hour move was a large train. We expect to be on the train about 2 days and 2 nights. I don't like it very well, to be left alone with this train alone, but the lieutenant seems to think that I can handle it all myself, so must be I can. The old corpral  is  never left alone with

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the transport.  I guess it's because he gets excited pretty easy, and he seems to forget what he has got to do. The way I remember my orders is I  always write it down and work from that. I think it's a good way at that. I maybe won't see the rest of the first train for a week or two. The leutenant how and where to draw rations for the transport and for the infintry and for my drivers. I sure like my new work very much. I don't know how much longer I will be Cpl. it's much easier to be a driver than to be N.C.O. Got to the depot at  8:00 PM. Had our train all loaded at 10:30 PM everything worked out. We put 6 horses in each car. We roamed around town from 10:30 AM until 11:45 PM. This is the time the train pulled out. The name of the

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place is called Segamel. Here is some of the places we passed through. I couldn't see any of the places during the night, but these are the ones I saw the next day. August 8, 1918 Wensday - Ponvang, Heurquer,Joyiselle, Melliery, Selehorsey, Laert-Gaugher.  304th Division are located here.  St. Semon, Chailly-Bossey, Sortie, Crecy. Stopped here for dinner.   I got the places mixed up a little. These are the first places. This place is where we got on the train. Blainville, Goncaust, Danage-aux, Ligny, Nelanies, Dofamet, Reuigny, Lumpasum, Hassunmont, Linthes. The name of the depot we got off at is called --------. We Hiked from here to Crecy. Got there at 5:00 AM. Slept until  9:30 AM. And I called the rest of the men at 11:00 AM

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ate dinner, fed teams and then we moved to the next town.  We got there at 2:30 PM, then we went back to depot which is 12 killimeters and drawed 4 days rations. Got  home again at 10:00 PM. We were on the train one night and one day until 12:00 AM the next day. We stayed in this place 1 1/2 days  Aug. 8, 1918 Wensday  - I took one of my limbers and went 10 killimeters to get a horse collar and a few other articles to repair my train, and I found the rest of our train.Lt. Austin  and corporal David. They were waiting for me, because the order had been changed. Now the order is that it is a hurry up case, so the auto trucks are taking the infintry with them and we're coming along later with our train of horses and wagons

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August 9, 1918 Thursday - Got up at 6:00 AM, thinking of moving again. The infintry goes tonight and we're going to start at 8:00 PM. This afternoon I supplied the infantry with ammunition. Each man is to have 100 rounds in his belt, and one bandiller on his shoulder which holds 60 rounds, so you see, this took a lot of ammunition. Got back again at 9:00 PM. ready to move out, we got all 4  of the co. lined up and we're ready to start moving at 11 PM. We went 23 kilometers to the place they call Caulinniers. This is the prettiest  place I ever saw and my life.  I can't begin to explain it.   Little pond, tame fish, artificial trees, great lawns ,marble floors in barn, all kinds of rigs, steel fence around the place, beautiful park, hothouse ......

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place, this is all one farm, some sight, I'll say.  August 10, 1918 Friday  - We hit this place at 5,   bells this morning, sleep until 9:00 AM. Ate breakfast, took one of horses, ate dinner at 12:00 bells. The order is that we move again at 9:00 PM this evening, don't know where we are going yet.  I haven't seen the map We started out at 9 PM, moved all night.  August 11,1918 Saturday - We didn't stop until this noon at 1:00 PM not even to eat or drink. This was some train,  the whole 77 Division. This train was around 10 kilometers long, so you can imagine the excitement I feel. It is  a great honor that I was a corpral in this great train. We lost on this day's march  X horses, 2 kitchens, and...

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10 horses. I think this is pretty good for such a long march, 28 killimeters. I have 2 saddle horses. Ride one half way, the other one the rest of the way. Blaine W. is with us to. He rode on a g.s. wagon, and doesn't lose any sleep much. This place is called ----. Just before we reached this place we crossed the river ----. where the Germans were driven across and blown up on the 18th of July, 1918. They sure have damaged the country in awful shape wherever they have been.  August 12, 1918 Sunday - We slept 2 hours, and got ready to move again We're ready at 9:00 PM Lt Austin left it to me to get the train out that we belong to. This was just my hobby because I had figured on it most of the afternoon how to arrange the train and it sure worked  fine.

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August 13, 1918 Monday - We are moving up to the western front now. This is the strongest German frontl there is. This is called the Chateau-Thierry front. The Americans have captured this  place, and also Cugny and Grand Rosery, which lie not less than a kilometer to the east of the highway from Soissons to Chateau-Thierry. August 14, 1918 Tuesday - We reach these woods  during the night, but don't know how long we will stay here. At 8:30  Lt Austin says to me I want you to be corpral over the advance guard, and I am sending 2 cavalry men with you. In other words, it is called scouting, we are to move again, this is why they need an advance guard.

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August 15,1918 Wednesday - We moved again last night. We only moved about 4 killmieters. The Germans sure are doing some damage here all right, but the Americans have got them on the run. They have them in a side hill and it's an awful hard job to drive them over, they haven't dirven them over yet, but they expect to into a few days.  August 15, 1918 Thursday - The American causilities is great on account of gas. This is the greatest enemy to content with. We get gassed at least three times a night. This spoils a man's rest. Mustard gas is the worst gas there is. It seems to burn right through your clothes. I was up to the line today hunting up one of air....

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is nothing, but today anyway I found him at 8:15 PM.Got home at 10:00 PM. Got ready to go with the Lt. to the line again with rations.  August 17, 1918 Friday - I am on the sick list now.  I don't just know what is the matter with me, one thing is that I have a awful dyrea, was in bed all day. August 18, 1918  Saturday - Not feeling any better yet.  Got a letter from home saying that father and mother were both sick a bed. The doctor came up to see me tonight. He says I'm working too hard, and that I must rest up for a while. He gave me some pills to take every hour.  August 19, 1918 Sunday - am feeling a little....

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up again this morning,  he thought I was some better, this is the first real rest I've had since I've been in France.  The casualties of the 305th is about 3590. This is just the infantry, and the supply co. not any yet, although there are 3 men missing. We don't know where they are at. We have lost about 6 or 7 horses,so you see ,we are doing pretty well. I got a letter from brother Willie today, he says he's feeling fine, and that he is driving mules also.  August 20, 1918 Monday - Feeling a little better again this morning. but the doctor says not to do any work until he says so. The leutenant says he misses me very much and hopes that they won't take me to the hospital.

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Well, I don't think I'll give them a chance either. We lost another horse today. The French and Americans are pushing the Germans back at a good speed. One ration cart came home this morning with 2 German prisoners. Pretty good night's work, what do you say. And they still have them on the run, so everything is coming our way just yet.  August 21, 1918 Tuesday - Feeling better this morning, made up my mind, I've laid around long enough for me. Stood Revilea and pitched in as usual, saddled my horse again, the first time for 5 days. Went out with the kitchen train. Got back at 1:40 AM. This nearly killed me because the weather is so awful hot during the day, there are 3 of..

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us sleeping together, Jim Reynolds, Phillip Enright , and myself. They were sure good to me while I was sick. Thi meant a whole lot to me, I'll say.  I sure haven't had any trouble with the men yet, and I don't want to anyway, getting along with the men is half of the work. We are going to move again tonight, we are getting ready to go quick as possible so we can get out before dark .this means another hard night for the N.C.O. We don't know what time we will move yet. Started out 9:00 PM, Got there at 12:00 AM. I got to bed at 1:30 AM. sleep until 5:30 AM. Next morning we had some time moving.  August 22, 1918 Wednesday Sometime settling, I'llsay. Had to cut down trees for a picket line.

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and we have to lay down side of them. This woods is where so many Germans were killed and didn't have time to burry them, so you can imagine how it smells. Dead horses and men.  August 23, 1918 Thursday - Got up again at 5:30 AM. Some of our men went up to the lines again last night, we lost 3 Horses, two of them were killed right and one had a broken leg and we had to kill him.  They got home at 4:30 AM. The boys were sure some excited. Blew one wagon all to pieces, and one kitchen, but no one was hurt very much. This is some life, I went up there by day light, but this was to fast a life for me. I was up there looking after a team of horses and a driver, and I found them too. They were all right, I found them in a dugout nearly starved to death, but I didn't dare leave them.

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August 24, 1918  Friday - Got up at 5:30 AM,  feeling time. ... a poor report on roll call, some men missing yet, 5 more horses killed, and some wagons, but the boys drove the Germans over the big hill.  They left their packs laying in the woods and went over the hill in their shirt sleeves, with the American cavalry,  500 of them. The cavalry sure is doing good work, their swords are shining bright, and sharp like a butcher knife. They also have all kinds of side arms.  Most of our drivers are sick with dyrea. Our Leutenant is sick in the hospital, but is coming out tonight, I hope so, anyway. The weather is sure hot out here. August 25, 1918 Saturday - Battalions change in the lines again. The1st Bat go in, and the 2nd

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battalion move out. This will make another exciting evening. Our  leutenant not come out of the hospital yet. Some of our men are getting better, but there 4 of them that are pretty sick. One has such a backache that he can't get half way up... , and 2 of them have such cramps that they can't hardly stand. And one I  think has been rupured. He had a bag of oats thrown over his shoulder and it was too heavy, and it strained his side. He has had it for 4 days now. The bag weighed  200 pounds.We lost another horse again last night, but no men hurt. Say, but this is a very active front.  I got two letters today, one from (M.A., N.H.) I wrote 4 letters for (H.A.)(M.R.)(F.R.)(N.H.)  I don't get much time to write because we are pretty near the front line, and there is lots of  work to do

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especially when you loose a horse or 2  every night. This means rig up another team. August 26, 1918 Sunday - Got up an hour later this morning because it's Sunday. This seems like a half a day. Not much work today, They left it all corpral what they wanted the men to do, So you know how much work our men did. We cleaned our picket line, and took care of our horses,  and slept the rest of the day. Some of the battalion had ...clean harnesses and grease wagons. That's the difference in the corprals. I made more by not working them than I would  if we would of worked.  I wrote 2 letters again today.  August 27, 1918 Monday - We had some shower during the night, it d thundered and lightened most awful hard.This is the first time I have seen it lightning and thunder while I have been in France.

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It rained until about 11:00 bells and then the sun came out strong, and the weather was fine all day.  The worst of it is our leutenants hasn't got back yet. We miss him a whole lot. Our captain is in the hospital also. We are on top of a big hill and can look down in the flats and see the ruins of the 2 cities or towns where such awful hard fighting was going on. There isn't a rod of ground where there isn't a shell hole. Most of them are filled up with dead soldiers. And say but this is an awful smell. It smells much different than if an animal had died. It is much stronger. We are located in the edge of a big woods where the Germans hung the soldiers that she captured because they were found when the American came through after  the Germans retreated. This sure is an awful thing to look at for the American boys.

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We are changing off about going up the lines, our wagons go up tonight for the 2nd battalion and the 2nd battalion deliver rations to our companies. This gives each battalion a chance to go to the lines.  Our battalion is expected to go up in a few days.  September 12, 1918 Monday I am pretty  far behind with my dyrea, so will put it all in today's report.  Well, our American  77th division made an advance t his past week, and of course we had to keep up with them. Well in fell on me to take a train of transport and follow them up. Well I pulled my train of 25 wagons from Nesle Woods to the Red Line Woods, and from there to Chevy-Chartreuve. From there turned sharp to left and d went to Lt.Thibaut. I got here at 2:30 AM.  I started from Nesle Woods at 9:30 AM this morning. This was some

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drive for one day, and for one man all alone, finding my own way also. Well, we went put up for the night until 5 AM, and from here I was going to Perles, but I couldn't get across the River Nesle. This is that great river where so many lives were lost. When  I got here inspecting my road I saw about 10 American soldiers and about 12 German soldiers dead, and  hadn't had  time to burry them, and I don't know how many horses laid in the road. Well. the Engineers got to this bridge about 1 1/2 hour later than I did and they told me that they would have it passable by 1:00 PM. So we waited until 8:00 AM before we hitched up. i gave one team of 4 in hand  to the Cernalto to help get this bridge across

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and I gave them 3 wagons for to hall amonition up that the boys had left behind when they had the   Germans on the run. I got back to Lt.. Thibaut about 1:30 PM. The bridge was ready so I passed over the Nesle into Bozocher. This place was all blown to pieces. This is where the first aid dressing station is now, so you see I am getting pretty near to the boys. I went up the hill they call LaLangue Haye Hill. Say, but this is some hill It is 3 miles long and all shell holes, so you can imagine what is was to pull 25 wagons up here and amunsk this train I had 10 rolling

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Americans kitchens, and these are awful heavy. I had 4 horses on each kitchen and 4 horses on each wagon. 2 on water carts and 2 on limbers, and 2 on ration carts, so you see, I had some train,  and I didn't see my Lt. for 3days so I think I am doing pretty good for a boy. The next day I delivered rations to the boys and I got into Perles, and 6  airplanes came over and began to drop bombs on this place. Say, but this was one close call of my life. They dropped within 100 yards from me, but I ducked under a limber full of amonition. It got a few of the artillery men here...

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pretty tired to, I'll say. We got there at4:00 PM. I didn't go to bed at all,  because the Leutenant didn't come along with us, and I had to take three g.s. and 3 limbers back to Bayon to get the baggage that was left behind with The Leutenant, we started out at 8:30 AM, Got to Bayon  at 12:15 PM . Met the Leutenant  and loaded up our wagon and started back. I rode the Leutenant's horse and he rode on one of the g.s. wagons. We got home at 6:15 PM and I am all in now, and my bunk for the night is in a horse manger, not very good bunk at that. We are ready to move again in the morning.  August 4, Saturday  - G,ot up at 6:38 AM thinking of moving again Cpl. David and myself to 12 of the rigs to

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the next place they call  ------. We got there at 3:45 PM. I stayed here and corpral David went back and I stayed with the boys at this place. The other transport got there at 11:00 PM. this transport is composed of kitchens, water carts, company carts. I got back to bed at 11:45 PM. Sleept under the wagon with (Or nas) my old bedfellow.  August 5, 1918 Sunday - Got up at 7:00 AM Fed our horses, ate breakfast. Didn't do any work all day except I run across a pretty nice girl here in a hotel. The nicest girl I've seen since I've been in France. I am in charge of the transport today because of the other fellow's day off ,so I can't stay away very long at a time. But the boys are all pretty good about

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it.  August 6, 1918 Monday - Got up at 6:00 AM. The order was changed again. We are not moving today. I'm glad of it. We had to go about 6 killimeters for rations today. I don't know the name of the place. Started away at 8:30 AM. Got home at 7:30 PM, some wait for rations, I'll say. We are  all ready to move tomorrow, we expect to go in two trains. The first train leaves at 12:00 PM ,the second train at 1 PM unless the orders are changed. Corpral  David and myself had conference with our Leutenant doping out how to make this move without any trouble.

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August 7, 1918 Got up at 4:45 AM Fed teams, and was ready for chow at 5:30 AM. We got ready to move and ready to start the first train at 10:30 AM. dinner last and horses harnessed. Lt Austin, and corpral  David take the first train and I take the second train all alone. The time was changed in moving. The first train leaves at 11:30 AM and my train don't leave until 7 PM. We are about 5  killimeters from the loading place. About 1 1/2 hour move was a large train. We expect to be on the train about 2 days and 2 nights. I don't like it very well, to be left alone with this train alone, but the lieutenant seems to think that I can handle it all myself, so must be I can. The old corpral  is  never left alone with

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the transport.  I guess it's because he gets excited pretty easy, and he seems to forget what he has got to do. The way I remember my orders is I  always write it down and work from that. I think it's a good way at that. I maybe won't see the rest of the first train for a week or two. The leutenant how and where to draw rations for the transport and for the infintry and for my drivers. I sure like my new work very much. I don't know how much longer I will be Cpl. it's much easier to be a driver than to be N.C.O. Got to the depot at  8:00 PM. Had our train all loaded at 10:30 PM everything worked out. We put 6 horses in each car. We roamed around town from 10:30 AM until 11:45 PM. This is the time the train pulled out. The name of the

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place is called Segamel. Here is some of the places we passed through. I couldn't see any of the places during the night, but these are the ones I saw the next day. August 8, 1918 Wensday - Ponvang, Heurquer,Joyiselle, Melliery, Selehorsey, Laert-Gaugher.  304th Division are located here.  St. Semon, Chailly-Bossey, Sortie, Crecy. Stopped here for dinner.   I got the places mixed up a little. These are the first places. This place is where we got on the train. Blainville, Goncaust, Danage-aux, Ligny, Nelanies, Dofamet, Reuigny, Lumpasum, Hassunmont, Linthes. The name of the depot we got off at is called --------. We Hiked from here to Crecy. Got there at 5:00 AM. Slept until  9:30 AM. And I called the rest of the men at 11:00 AM

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ate dinner, fed teams and then we moved to the next town.  We got there at 2:30 PM, then we went back to depot which is 12 killimeters and drawed 4 days rations. Got  home again at 10:00 PM. We were on the train one night and one day until 12:00 AM the next day. We stayed in this place 1 1/2 days  Aug. 8, 1918 Wensday  - I took one of my limbers and went 10 killimeters to get a horse collar and a few other articles to repair my train, and I found the rest of our train.Lt. Austin  and corporal David. They were waiting for me, because the order had been changed. Now the order is that it is a hurry up case, so the auto trucks are taking the infintry with them and we're coming along later with our train of horses and wagons

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August 9, 1918 Thursday - Got up at 6:00 AM, thinking of moving again. The infintry goes tonight and we're going to start at 8:00 PM. This afternoon I supplied the infantry with ammunition. Each man is to have 100 rounds in his belt, and one bandiller on his shoulder which holds 60 rounds, so you see, this took a lot of ammunition. Got back again at 9:00 PM. ready to move out, we got all 4  of the co. lined up and we're ready to start moving at 11 PM. We went 23 kilometers to the place they call Caulinniers. This is the prettiest  place I ever saw and my life.  I can't begin to explain it.   Little pond, tame fish, artificial trees, great lawns ,marble floors in barn, all kinds of rigs, steel fence around the place, beautiful park, hothouse ......

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place, this is all one farm, some sight, I'll say.  August 10, 1918 Friday  - We hit this place at 5,   bells this morning, sleep until 9:00 AM. Ate breakfast, took one of horses, ate dinner at 12:00 bells. The order is that we move again at 9:00 PM this evening, don't know where we are going yet.  I haven't seen the map We started out at 9 PM, moved all night.  August 11,1918 Saturday - We didn't stop until this noon at 1:00 PM not even to eat or drink. This was some train,  the whole 77 Division. This train was around 10 kilometers long, so you can imagine the excitement I feel. It is  a great honor that I was a corpral in this great train. We lost on this day's march  X horses, 2 kitchens, and...

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10 horses. I think this is pretty good for such a long march, 28 killimeters. I have 2 saddle horses. Ride one half way, the other one the rest of the way. Blaine W. is with us to. He rode on a g.s. wagon, and doesn't lose any sleep much. This place is called ----. Just before we reached this place we crossed the river ----. where the Germans were driven across and blown up on the 18th of July, 1918. They sure have damaged the country in awful shape wherever they have been.  August 12, 1918 Sunday - We slept 2 hours, and got ready to move again We're ready at 9:00 PM Lt Austin left it to me to get the train out that we belong to. This was just my hobby because I had figured on it most of the afternoon how to arrange the train and it sure worked  fine.

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August 13, 1918 Monday - We are moving up to the western front now. This is the strongest German frontl there is. This is called the Chateau-Thierry front. The Americans have captured this  place, and also Cugny and Grand Rosery, which lie not less than a kilometer to the east of the highway from Soissons to Chateau-Thierry. August 14, 1918 Tuesday - We reach these woods  during the night, but don't know how long we will stay here. At 8:30  Lt Austin says to me I want you to be corpral over the advance guard, and I am sending 2 cavalry men with you. In other words, it is called scouting, we are to move again, this is why they need an advance guard.

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August 15,1918 Wednesday - We moved again last night. We only moved about 4 killmieters. The Germans sure are doing some damage here all right, but the Americans have got them on the run. They have them in a side hill and it's an awful hard job to drive them over, they haven't dirven them over yet, but they expect to into a few days.  August 15, 1918 Thursday - The American causilities is great on account of gas. This is the greatest enemy to content with. We get gassed at least three times a night. This spoils a man's rest. Mustard gas is the worst gas there is. It seems to burn right through your clothes. I was up to the line today hunting up one of air....

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is nothing, but today anyway I found him at 8:15 PM.Got home at 10:00 PM. Got ready to go with the Lt. to the line again with rations.  August 17, 1918 Friday - I am on the sick list now.  I don't just know what is the matter with me, one thing is that I have a awful dyrea, was in bed all day. August 18, 1918  Saturday - Not feeling any better yet.  Got a letter from home saying that father and mother were both sick a bed. The doctor came up to see me tonight. He says I'm working too hard, and that I must rest up for a while. He gave me some pills to take every hour.  August 19, 1918 Sunday - am feeling a little....

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up again this morning,  he thought I was some better, this is the first real rest I've had since I've been in France.  The casualties of the 305th is about 3590. This is just the infantry, and the supply co. not any yet, although there are 3 men missing. We don't know where they are at. We have lost about 6 or 7 horses,so you see ,we are doing pretty well. I got a letter from brother Willie today, he says he's feeling fine, and that he is driving mules also.  August 20, 1918 Monday - Feeling a little better again this morning. but the doctor says not to do any work until he says so. The leutenant says he misses me very much and hopes that they won't take me to the hospital.

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Well, I don't think I'll give them a chance either. We lost another horse today. The French and Americans are pushing the Germans back at a good speed. One ration cart came home this morning with 2 German prisoners. Pretty good night's work, what do you say. And they still have them on the run, so everything is coming our way just yet.  August 21, 1918 Tuesday - Feeling better this morning, made up my mind, I've laid around long enough for me. Stood Revilea and pitched in as usual, saddled my horse again, the first time for 5 days. Went out with the kitchen train. Got back at 1:40 AM. This nearly killed me because the weather is so awful hot during the day, there are 3 of..

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us sleeping together, Jim Reynolds, Phillip Enright , and myself. They were sure good to me while I was sick. Thi meant a whole lot to me, I'll say.  I sure haven't had any trouble with the men yet, and I don't want to anyway, getting along with the men is half of the work. We are going to move again tonight, we are getting ready to go quick as possible so we can get out before dark .this means another hard night for the N.C.O. We don't know what time we will move yet. Started out 9:00 PM, Got there at 12:00 AM. I got to bed at 1:30 AM. sleep until 5:30 AM. Next morning we had some time moving.  August 22, 1918 Wednesday Sometime settling, I'llsay. Had to cut down trees for a picket line.

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and we have to lay down side of them. This woods is where so many Germans were killed and didn't have time to burry them, so you can imagine how it smells. Dead horses and men.  August 23, 1918 Thursday - Got up again at 5:30 AM. Some of our men went up to the lines again last night, we lost 3 Horses, two of them were killed right and one had a broken leg and we had to kill him.  They got home at 4:30 AM. The boys were sure some excited. Blew one wagon all to pieces, and one kitchen, but no one was hurt very much. This is some life, I went up there by day light, but this was to fast a life for me. I was up there looking after a team of horses and a driver, and I found them too. They were all right, I found them in a dugout nearly starved to death, but I didn't dare leave them.

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August 24, 1918  Friday - Got up at 5:30 AM,  feeling time. ... a poor report on roll call, some men missing yet, 5 more horses killed, and some wagons, but the boys drove the Germans over the big hill.  They left their packs laying in the woods and went over the hill in their shirt sleeves, with the American cavalry,  500 of them. The cavalry sure is doing good work, their swords are shining bright, and sharp like a butcher knife. They also have all kinds of side arms.  Most of our drivers are sick with dyrea. Our Leutenant is sick in the hospital, but is coming out tonight, I hope so, anyway. The weather is sure hot out here. August 25, 1918 Saturday - Battalions change in the lines again. The1st Bat go in, and the 2nd

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battalion move out. This will make another exciting evening. Our  leutenant not come out of the hospital yet. Some of our men are getting better, but there 4 of them that are pretty sick. One has such a backache that he can't get half way up... , and 2 of them have such cramps that they can't hardly stand. And one I  think has been rupured. He had a bag of oats thrown over his shoulder and it was too heavy, and it strained his side. He has had it for 4 days now. The bag weighed  200 pounds.We lost another horse again last night, but no men hurt. Say, but this is a very active front.  I got two letters today, one from (M.A., N.H.) I wrote 4 letters for (H.A.)(M.R.)(F.R.)(N.H.)  I don't get much time to write because we are pretty near the front line, and there is lots of  work to do

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especially when you loose a horse or 2  every night. This means rig up another team. August 26, 1918 Sunday - Got up an hour later this morning because it's Sunday. This seems like a half a day. Not much work today, They left it all corpral what they wanted the men to do, So you know how much work our men did. We cleaned our picket line, and took care of our horses,  and slept the rest of the day. Some of the battalion had ...clean harnesses and grease wagons. That's the difference in the corprals. I made more by not working them than I would  if we would of worked.  I wrote 2 letters again today.  August 27, 1918 Monday - We had some shower during the night, it d thundered and lightened most awful hard.This is the first time I have seen it lightning and thunder while I have been in France.

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It rained until about 11:00 bells and then the sun came out strong, and the weather was fine all day.  The worst of it is our leutenants hasn't got back yet. We miss him a whole lot. Our captain is in the hospital also. We are on top of a big hill and can look down in the flats and see the ruins of the 2 cities or towns where such awful hard fighting was going on. There isn't a rod of ground where there isn't a shell hole. Most of them are filled up with dead soldiers. And say but this is an awful smell. It smells much different than if an animal had died. It is much stronger. We are located in the edge of a big woods where the Germans hung the soldiers that she captured because they were found when the American came through after  the Germans retreated. This sure is an awful thing to look at for the American boys.

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We are changing off about going up the lines, our wagons go up tonight for the 2nd battalion and the 2nd battalion deliver rations to our companies. This gives each battalion a chance to go to the lines.  Our battalion is expected to go up in a few days.  September 12, 1918 Monday I am pretty  far behind with my dyrea, so will put it all in today's report.  Well, our American  77th division made an advance t his past week, and of course we had to keep up with them. Well in fell on me to take a train of transport and follow them up. Well I pulled my train of 25 wagons from Nesle Woods to the Red Line Woods, and from there to Chevy-Chartreuve. From there turned sharp to left and d went to Lt.Thibaut. I got here at 2:30 AM.  I started from Nesle Woods at 9:30 AM this morning. This was some

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drive for one day, and for one man all alone, finding my own way also. Well, we went put up for the night until 5 AM, and from here I was going to Perles, but I couldn't get across the River Nesle. This is that great river where so many lives were lost. When  I got here inspecting my road I saw about 10 American soldiers and about 12 German soldiers dead, and  hadn't had  time to burry them, and I don't know how many horses laid in the road. Well. the Engineers got to this bridge about 1 1/2 hour later than I did and they told me that they would have it passable by 1:00 PM. So we waited until 8:00 AM before we hitched up. i gave one team of 4 in hand  to the Cernalto to help get this bridge across

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and I gave them 3 wagons for to hall amonition up that the boys had left behind when they had the   Germans on the run. I got back to Lt.. Thibaut about 1:30 PM. The bridge was ready so I passed over the Nesle into Bozocher. This place was all blown to pieces. This is where the first aid dressing station is now, so you see I am getting pretty near to the boys. I went up the hill they call LaLangue Haye Hill. Say, but this is some hill It is 3 miles long and all shell holes, so you can imagine what is was to pull 25 wagons up here and amunsk this train I had 10 rolling

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Americans kitchens, and these are awful heavy. I had 4 horses on each kitchen and 4 horses on each wagon. 2 on water carts and 2 on limbers, and 2 on ration carts, so you see, I had some train,  and I didn't see my Lt. for 3days so I think I am doing pretty good for a boy. The next day I delivered rations to the boys and I got into Perles, and 6  airplanes came over and began to drop bombs on this place. Say, but this was one close call of my life. They dropped within 100 yards from me, but I ducked under a limber full of amonition. It got a few of the artillery men here...

1918 Sunday - am feeling a little....

says he misses me very much and hopes that they won't take me to the hospital.

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they asked me to get to get the ambulance for them, but none of my train got hurt because I left them on the other road where they were safe. The boys sure were scart when they heard the airplane pass over the place. They were worried about me for fear I would get struck. The next day I cleaned out the Red Line woods, that is packed up all the ammunition, kitchen utensils, clothing, tools, so on so forth. There was 2 g.s. wagons with 6 men and in all there was 10 of us. We had a little picnic. We made crellas and coffee, laid down and went back home again. Last night I went up to the line and didn't have very much luck. I went up with ...

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one horse was killed, 4 others hurt with shrapnel, except my riding horse. It was hit with a machine gun bullet, but he will make a pull of it all right. The one horse had his wind pipe cut clean off so you can imagine how he suffered, but we drove him home, and 3 of my men were hit with shrapnel. One fellow had a shrapnel go through both hands. one fellow through his one leg, and the other one in his shoulder, but none very serious This was some night for me I had to take these fellows to the first aid station and make a report to the cernel what had happened. He seem to be satisfied with what I had done ....

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I set the stuff within 10 feet of the front line trench where they were fighting. They shot rifles, trench moters, machine guns and shells at us, but we came out in pretty good shape after all.  I got home this morning at 3:00 AM . I started out from here at 4:20, so you can see what I was up against all night all alone with 10 wagons. I certainly get worked out in this outfit. We have so many men that are unfit for the front line work with rations.  October 17,1918  It has been some time since I have keep my dyrea. but it has been all most impossible for me to do so because I sure have been some busy. I am...

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sorry that I didn't keep up this dyrea while we were at the Chateau Thiery front because this sure was some active front. all right  Our total animals filled and turned in from wounds amounted to 38 animals from this front. This was some loss I'll say. I forget how many rolling kitchens and wagons that were blown up on this front. Sure worked on my nerves. I had to go up nearly every night , I sure lost a pile of flesh here , but I sure got a good stand in with Major Haul since I crossed the vesle river at St. Thibaut with a train of 25 wagons. He says if you can handle this train across the river to Nencere over by the Bay of Pearls you can handle 

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a Leutenants job. This sure put the pep into me. Well, I sure delivered my train without any exceptions, and the major took my name. We left this front and 16 Sept.1918. We were 8 days on the road hyking our wagons along day and night. We made about 40 kilo  every day rain or shine,  we hit our next front which is called (Argonne Forest), the first place we hit was (Lia-Chalet) .Here is where the French had such nices dug out, they had electrical lights, cave cookers. Everything right up fine, they even had some women living with them, and after the drive was started the Germans were driven from their caves and they sure had to leave.

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some awful wee homes, they all so had electric lights, soda fountains, salones. they even raised chickens and rabbets where they were, because when the American boys got there  they found these things. The way the Germans delivered their rations up to the trenches was by railroad, they had small engines and cars. These roads from all through these woods and lead right into Germany. the Americans are using the same cars and railroad, we use them mostly for ammunition, they sure are fine. I go up to the front lines every other day except for the past week. I have been in charge of a guard over the ration dump, which was left behind when the 2nd

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advance was made, so you can see I am having a little vacation now.  October 15, 1918 we lost one of our best drivers, Jim Elliott . He had his skull crushed with a shell and Phil Enright was wounded and was sent to the hospital. One corporal (Santi) was wounded. He died the next day. This was some jar for me,  these men were awful good friends of mine. I sure was one happy boy the 10th  of October when I met my brother Willie and Edward. Then the evening I saddled up my horse

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